Ed Bott

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Ed Bott is an award-winning technology writer with more than two decades' experience writing for mainstream media outlets and online publications. He has served as editor of the U.S. edition of PC Computing and managing editor of PC World; both publications had monthly paid circulation in excess of 1 million during his tenure. He is the author of more than 25 books, including Windows 10 Inside Out (now in its 4th edition) and Windows 11 Inside Out (scheduled for publication in 2022).

Ed Bott is a freelance technology journalist and book author. All work that Ed does is on a contractual basis. Since 1994, Ed has written more than 25 books about Microsoft Windows and Office. Along with various co-authors, Ed is completely responsible for the content of the books he writes. As a key part of his contractual relationship with publishers, he gives them permission to print and distribute the content he writes and to pay him a royalty based on the actual sales of those books. Ed's books are currently distributed by Pearson Education under the Microsoft Press imprint. On occasion, Ed accepts consulting assignments. In recent years, he has worked as an expert witness in cases where his experience and his knowledge of Microsoft technology and licensing have been useful. In each such case, his compensation is on an hourly basis, and he is hired as a witness, not an advocate. Ed sometimes receive fees and/or travel expenses for live speeches and webinars from companies and organizations. Acceptance of these fees does not constitute an endorsement of the company's products. Ed does not own stock or have any financial interest in any technology company. Ed does not accept gifts from companies he covers. All hardware products he writes about are purchased with his own funds or are review units covered under formal loan agreements and are returned after the review is complete.

Latest from Ed Bott

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How browsers and security software can keep you safer online

How browsers and security software can keep you safer online

The traditional role of security software is to scan incoming files and block those that it knows are dangerous. Unfortunately, the bad guys have figured out how to get around that sort of system. More modern security solutions supplement virus definitions and scanning with software that checks for suspicious behavior. They are also able to check the reputation of a website or a specific file and make it much more likely you'll make the correct trust decisions.In this slide show, I look at how the three most popular browsers for Windows are adding these types of features. I also look at new versions of security software from some old names. Surprisingly, both Trend Micro and Norton are doing innovative work that goes beyond mere scanning.

August 10, 2011 by in Security

How to stay safe online with a PC or Mac

How to stay safe online with a PC or Mac

Many people think that security begins and ends with antivirus software. I disagree. Of course you should run a well-supported, up-to-date security program—whether you use a PC or a Mac. What else do you need to do? In this gallery and the accompanying blog post, I share the five steps I teach to friends, family members, and clients who want to avoid malware, scareware, phishing sites, and other online scams.

July 7, 2011 by in Security

How Apple has responded to Mac malware

How Apple has responded to Mac malware

In May 2011, Apple issued its first-ever security update designed to remove malware on Macs. Has Apple's response to Mac Defender been good enough for its customers? And is Apple prepared for the next attack? This gallery shows what Apple has done with Security Update 2011-003.

June 19, 2011 by in Security

Mac malware in the wild

Mac malware in the wild

Want proof that the bad guys are starting to target Mac users? Take a look at this series of screens, which show an attempt to convince a user to install a fake antivirus program that has a nasty payload

May 6, 2011 by in Security

IE9 versus Google: which one handles social engineering attacks better?

IE9 versus Google: which one handles social engineering attacks better?

Social engineering has become the dominant method of distribution for fake antivirus software these days. In my real-world testing with actual malware, Google Chrome did a terrible job of helping users avoid suspicious downloads. Meanwhile, Internet Explorer 9 correctly the exact same sites and files as suspicious. What's the difference?

April 25, 2011 by in Security