Ed Bott

Senior Contributing Editor

Ed Bott is an award-winning technology writer with more than two decades' experience writing for mainstream media outlets and online publications. He has served as editor of the U.S. edition of PC Computing and managing editor of PC World; both publications had monthly paid circulation in excess of 1 million during his tenure. He is the author of more than 25 books, including Windows 10 Inside Out (now in its 4th edition) and Windows 11 Inside Out (scheduled for publication in 2022).

Ed Bott is a freelance technology journalist and book author. All work that Ed does is on a contractual basis. Since 1994, Ed has written more than 25 books about Microsoft Windows and Office. Along with various co-authors, Ed is completely responsible for the content of the books he writes. As a key part of his contractual relationship with publishers, he gives them permission to print and distribute the content he writes and to pay him a royalty based on the actual sales of those books. Ed's books are currently distributed by Pearson Education under the Microsoft Press imprint. On occasion, Ed accepts consulting assignments. In recent years, he has worked as an expert witness in cases where his experience and his knowledge of Microsoft technology and licensing have been useful. In each such case, his compensation is on an hourly basis, and he is hired as a witness, not an advocate. Ed sometimes receives fees and/or travel expenses for live speeches and webinars from companies and organizations. Acceptance of these fees does not constitute an endorsement of the company's products. Ed does not own stock or have any financial interest in any technology company. Ed does not accept gifts from companies he covers. All hardware products he writes about are purchased with his own funds or are review units covered under formal loan agreements and are returned after the review is complete.

Latest from Ed Bott

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Can you spot a Facebook phishing attempt?

Can you spot a Facebook phishing attempt?

E-mail notifications are an important part of social networking services like Facebook. If you have to continually visit a web site to see what's new, you lose much of the excitement that comes with comments on your photos or other shared items. You might miss invitations to events or opportunities to connect with a long-lost friend who's in town for a day or two.But e-mail notifications are also a potential security risk. If a potential attacker can create a realistic-looking imitation of a Facebook notification, you might find yourself clicking on a link that can lead to malware or attempt to steal your login credentials.Spotting a fake isn't as easy as it seems. I've assembled four Facebook notifications that arrived in my e-mail inbox recently. Which are real, and which are fake? Answers are in the caption beneath each screen shot.

August 28, 2011 by in Collaboration

A closer look at Office Starter 2010

A closer look at Office Starter 2010

Office 2010 Starter is a new option that replaces the old, time-bombed trial versions from earlier Office versions. This no-nonsense splash screen explains what’s available in the “reduced functionality” version and includes one of many Purchase buttons available throughout the program.

June 14, 2010 by in Collaboration

A hands-on look at Microsoft Office for the iPhone

A hands-on look at Microsoft Office for the iPhone

At long last, Microsoft has released a version of its Office suite for iOS. The new app targets the iPhone and closely resembles the Office app that’s built into Windows Phone 8. Here's what you'll find in the new app, which is available from the App Store immediately.

June 14, 2013 by in Collaboration