Ed Bott

Senior Contributing Editor

Ed Bott is an award-winning technology writer with more than two decades' experience writing for mainstream media outlets and online publications. He has served as editor of the U.S. edition of PC Computing and managing editor of PC World; both publications had monthly paid circulation in excess of 1 million during his tenure. He is the author of more than 25 books, including Windows 10 Inside Out (now in its 4th edition) and Windows 11 Inside Out (scheduled for publication in 2022).

Ed Bott is a freelance technology journalist and book author. All work that Ed does is on a contractual basis. Since 1994, Ed has written more than 25 books about Microsoft Windows and Office. Along with various co-authors, Ed is completely responsible for the content of the books he writes. As a key part of his contractual relationship with publishers, he gives them permission to print and distribute the content he writes and to pay him a royalty based on the actual sales of those books. Ed's books are currently distributed by Pearson Education under the Microsoft Press imprint. On occasion, Ed accepts consulting assignments. In recent years, he has worked as an expert witness in cases where his experience and his knowledge of Microsoft technology and licensing have been useful. In each such case, his compensation is on an hourly basis, and he is hired as a witness, not an advocate. Ed sometimes receives fees and/or travel expenses for live speeches and webinars from companies and organizations. Acceptance of these fees does not constitute an endorsement of the company's products. Ed does not own stock or have any financial interest in any technology company. Ed does not accept gifts from companies he covers. All hardware products he writes about are purchased with his own funds or are review units covered under formal loan agreements and are returned after the review is complete.

Latest from Ed Bott

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It really is a new Microsoft

It really is a new Microsoft

Microsoft's new CEO, Satya Nadella, faced plenty of skepticism when he took the job earlier this year. But even skeptics have to admit that things have changed in Redmond. Here are four things the old Microsoft would never have done.

November 7, 2014 by in CXO

How green is your PC?

How green is your PC?

How much does it cost to run a PC or a Windows Home Server 24/7? I've just completed a abttery of power management tests in my office, and the numbers surprised me. In my neighborhood, running a home server costs about $5 a month in electricity, but I can cut that bill by two-thirds just by using the default power management settings in Windows Vista.

November 30, 2007 by in CXO

My Windows 7 wish list

My Windows 7 wish list

Cynics see the new Engineering Windows 7 blog, which launched last week, as a pure PR play from Microsoft. Maybe. But in a 2000-word post yesterday, Windows boos Steven Sinofsky provided some more details about the development effort, including some clues as to what to expect in Windows 7. In his post, Sinofsky lists the 25 main "feature teams" working on the next version of Windows. I've rearranged that list into nine groups and outlined what I think are the main challenges facing each one.

August 19, 2008 by in CXO

Eight usability tweaks in IE8

Eight usability tweaks in IE8

The ultimate improvement in browser performance is not making a page load faster but making it unnecessary to load the page at all. That's the guiding principle behind some of the most interesting interface changes in the official release of Internet Explorer 8. In this gallery, I take a closer look at each one.

March 19, 2009 by in CXO

What the enterprise needs to hear from Microsoft

What the enterprise needs to hear from Microsoft

When Microsoft execs take the stage later today to talk about what the next version of Windows will do for the enterprise, they'll be trying to restore confidence in something that's looking more and more like a legacy OS. Here's what they should be talking about.

September 30, 2014 by in CXO

Free Sysinternals Windows utilities now available online, 24/7

Free Sysinternals Windows utilities now available online, 24/7

If you troubleshoot Windows PCs for fun or profit, then chances are you've used one or more tools from Sysinternals. Microsoft bought the company and its amazing library of diagnostic and troubleshooting utilities in 2006, and the collection has been continually updated ever since. A few weeks ago, I ran into Sysinternals co-founder Mark Russinovich at a technical conference, where he told me about a new Sysinternals service that was in private beta testing. Today, I'm pleased to break the news that Sysinternals Live is now open to the public.

May 28, 2008 by in CXO

Debunking yet another bogus malware study

Debunking yet another bogus malware study

Here we go again, with yet another round of bogus reporting about the extent of malware infections in the United States. A wide range of news agencies are reporting the results of a new report that supposedly reveals that one in four computers in the U.S. are infected with malware. But all it takes is a little digging to discover that this is literally a fourth-hand report of data originally gathered in 2005. The most ironic part? When I tried to view the original report from the Pew Internet project, Google stopped me with a false warning that I was about to visit an unsafe site.

June 2, 2008 by in CXO