James Farrar

<p>James has more than 15 years of experience working on corporate sustainability issues from both the corporate and NGO campaigning perspective. He has worked directly within the banking (Farm Credit System), aviation (British Airways) and IT (SAP) sectors in the USA and Europe. His campaigning experience includes work at Amnesty International's business engagement programme and at Global Witness, a leading NGO campaigning on the issue of resource revenue transparency especially relating to so called 'conflict resources'.</p> James's day job is at SAP working within the Sustainability team. You can view James' extended profile on <a href="http://de.linkedin.com/pub/james-farrar/2/a47/743">Linkedin</a> and you can follow him on <a href="http://twitter.com/jamesfarrar">Twitter</a>.

The most important and material disclosure is of my employment with SAP. During the course of my job I come into regular contact with SAP stakeholders of all kinds including NGOs, customers, government representatives, customers, partners. I will draw from my daily experience in my writing but I will try to make sure I fully disclose any material relationship I might have as an employee of SAP with the subject matter of my writing to the best of my ability. My goal is to raise awareness of sustainable development issues across the tech sector in an objective and fair way. Any opinions expressed in this blog are entirely my own and not those of my employer or anyone else for that matter. I have no significant financial investments in any other tech companies. You may find my personal blog at www.jamesfarrar.wordpress.com

Latest from James Farrar

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Ireland: Shell's new Nigeria?

Ireland: Shell's new Nigeria?

Just as Shell brings to a close a difficult chapter in its troubled relationship with the Ogoni people in Nigeria, its relationship with community groups in the west of Ireland appears to be reaching new lows. Shell is the senior partner with Statoil and Marathon in an effort to bring off shore natural gas reserves on to the national grid in Ireland.

June 17, 2009 by in Innovation

From Blackberry to Greenberry: RIM Goes Green at CeBIT

From Blackberry to Greenberry: RIM Goes Green at CeBIT

Even with attendance and exhibitor numbers down CeBIT this week was still full steam ahead on green. Luis Neves, Head of Sustainability at Deutsche Telekom and Chairman of the Global eSustainability Initiative (GESI), during his keynote announced GESI's newest member will be Research In Motion, maker of the Blackberry.

March 6, 2009 by in Innovation

Vodafone's Big(ish?) Adventure

Vodafone's Big(ish?) Adventure

It's fun to think of similes to categorise the headlong rush towards CO2 reductions or at least the pledges for such. I think of Vodafone's pledge of a 50% cut of the 2007 baseline by 2020 as a 'Big Adventure'.

June 19, 2008 by in Innovation

US Congress Ready to Act on Human Rights Crisis in Tech Industry Supply Chains

US Congress Ready to Act on Human Rights Crisis in Tech Industry Supply Chains

Following on from yesterday's riff on traceability technology for Vietnamese fisheries, it turns out Silicon Valley may yet be its own best customer. Despite common knowledge of serious human rights abuses relating to the mining of cassiterite in the Democratic Republic of Congo the industry has not gone far enough to guarantee ethical sourcing to satisfy increasingly concerned stakeholders.

May 20, 2009 by in Innovation

Oracle & Google: Of Goats, Grids and GRI

Oracle & Google: Of Goats, Grids and GRI

Interesting developments this week for energy efficiency prospects with both Oracle and Google entering the fray of the green grid business. Oracle now boasts an end to end offering for Utilities so they can optimize resources and better manage sustainability performance.

May 22, 2009 by in Oracle

Green is still Gold (But Beware of the Politics of Gesture)

Green is still Gold (But Beware of the Politics of Gesture)

Foolhardy it may be to go out on a limb here to take on my boss (in this carnation I mean my editor, Larry Dignan) and a force of nature that is my fellow ZDNET blogger Dennis Howlett but I have to disagree with both on the subject of viability of the green market. Dennis thinks green is a fashion not to follow, fools gold maybe and Larry came away from Oracle Open World thinking that, with green, Silicon Valley is attempting to manufacture the next big thing.

February 28, 2009 by in Innovation