Michael Krigsman

Contributor

Michael Krigsman is an industry analyst and the host of CxOTalk, which tells stories of innovation and opportunity with the world's top business and technology leaders. He is a frequent speaker and panel moderator at technology conferences and advises the most successful enterprise companies on marketing and communications strategy. Michael's work has been referenced in the media over 1,000 times and in more than 50 books.

Michael Krigsman writes and speaks about technology in a manner that most observers consider to be fair and balanced. He maintains active personal and professional relationships with enterprise technology buyers, vendors, analyst firms (or individual analysts), consultants, and system integrators. As CEO of Asuret, Michael sells and delivers paid services to members of these same groups. Vendors regularly reimburse Michael's out-of-pocket travel expenses to attend industry conferences and events. Conference organizers frequently waive entry fees when Michael attends industry events. Michael often speaks at industry conferences and events. He is a member of the Enterprise Irregulars, a loose association of consultants, investors, industry representatives, analysts, and users of enterprise software. Interact with Michael on Twitter at @mkrigsman.

Latest from Michael Krigsman

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IT politics killed White House email project

IT politics killed White House email project

Data archiving in the White House is a serious business mandated by the Presidential Records Act of 1978, which was passed following the Watergate scandal. The Act requires the White House to maintain an historical archive of its activities, policies, and decisions. Despite this law, the White House email archiving system is a model of poor IT practice and has been called "primitive," "inadequate," and "not robust." The system fails to fulfill its most basic requirements: enabling reliable backup, storage, and restore capabilities.

May 6, 2008 by in Collaboration

Failed Carbonite upgrade lets customers down

Failed Carbonite upgrade lets customers down

I subscribe to Carbonite's backup service. Over the last couple of days, the teensy Carbonite icon in my system tray has been red, displaying a message that Carbonite's servers are unavailable. Today, I sent email to tech support, only to be informed that someone would get back to me "within 72 hours." That pretty much sucks when I'm paying for a high-availability service. If my hard drive crashes and I need assistance with restore, hopefully I won't need my data within 72 hours.Anyhow, I just received an email from Carbonite, describing a server upgrade problem:

March 11, 2008 by in Collaboration

Twitter is dangerous

Twitter is dangerous

Twitter is rapidly becoming a serious threat to corporate information protection. The program's great strength -- many-to-many messaging -- becomes its great weakness in this context.

December 19, 2007 by in Collaboration

Twitter / T-Mobile: when policy meets technology

Twitter / T-Mobile: when policy meets technology

Twitter (click to follow me) is a social networking phenomenon and powerful communication medium; it's shown vast growth and currently has almost 700,000 users. With these facts in mind, I was disappointed to hear that T-Mobile is blocking Twitter, since (unfortunately) I'm a T-Mobile customer and frequent Twitter user.

December 14, 2007 by in Collaboration

Gmail is down

Gmail is down

Update 8/11/08 10:45pm EDT: Gmail is back up now. According to the Gmail blog:Many of you had trouble accessing Gmail for a couple of hours this afternoon, and we're really sorry.

August 11, 2008 by in Collaboration