Ryan Naraine

Contributor

Ryan Naraine is a journalist and social media enthusiast specializing in Internet and computer security issues. He is currently security evangelist at Kaspersky Lab, an anti-malware company with operations around the globe. He is taking a leadership role in developing the company's online community initiative around secure content management technologies.Prior to joining Kaspersky Lab, Ryan was Editor-at-Large/Security at eWEEK, leading the magazine's and Web site's coverage of Internet and computer security issues and managing the popular SecurityWatch blog, covering the daily threats, vulnerabilities and IT security technologies. He also covered IT security, hacker attacks and secure content management topics for Jupiter Media's internetnetnews.com.Ryan can be reached at naraine SHIFT 2 gmail.com. For daily updates on Ryan's activities, follow him on Twitter.

The most important disclosure is of my employment with Kaspersky Lab as a member of the global research and analysis team. Kaspersky Lab is a global company specializing in anti-malware and secure content management technologies. I do not own stocks or other investments in any technology company.

Latest from Ryan Naraine

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ArcSight files for $75M IPO

ArcSight files for $75M IPO

Enterprise security and compliance management specialist ArcSight is shrugging off the jittery state of the public markets, filing an S-1 with the SEC for a $75 million initial public offering.

September 11, 2007 by in Legal

Kaspersky Lab eyes IPO, acquisitions

Kaspersky Lab eyes IPO, acquisitions

Steve Orenberg, who heads up Kaspersky's U.S. unit and joins the board as a new director, says the restructuring is the first step in a strategic plan to pursue an IPO (initial public offering) exit.

August 13, 2007 by in Legal

HID denies RFID demo threat, hackers worry

HID denies RFID demo threat, hackers worry

Black Hat Diary: IOActive's decision to cancel its RFID hacking demo is the main topic of conversation here as white hat hackers ponder the ramifications of a vendor using patent infringement claims to thwart legitimate security research. The company at the center of the storm, HID Global, issued a statement acknowledging that it may be possible to clone a proximity card but insisted it "did not threaten" IOActive researcher Chris Paget to nix the presentation.

February 28, 2007 by in Legal