Sean Portnoy

Contributor

Sean Portnoy started his tech writing career at ZDNet nearly a decade ago. He then spent several years as an editor at Computer Shopper magazine, most recently serving as an online executive editor. He received a B.A. from Brown University and an M.A. from the University of Southern California.

Sean Portnoy is a freelance technology journalist; currently, all work that Sean does is on a contractural basis. Sean has also written corporate communications documents for CA.Sean does not accept gifts from companies he covers. All hardware products he writes about are purchased with his own funds or are review units covered under formal loan agreements and are returned after the review is complete.

Latest from Sean Portnoy

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DVDO unleashes Edge high-definition video processor/input hub

DVDO unleashes Edge high-definition video processor/input hub

Home theater fans who aren't satisfied with their HDTVs' built-in video processing and/or just can't get enough HDMI ports into their setups may want to take a gander at DVDO's new Edge, which combines technology from Anchor Bay to improve video quality while also doubling as an A/V hub. At $799, it costs as much as some new TVs, but for video snobs it's more affordable than other options (such as buying a whole new set with the latest processing tech).

October 7, 2008 by in Amazon

Amazon finally adds HD titles to its Video On Demand service

Amazon finally adds HD titles to its Video On Demand service

After letting Netflix have the jump on offering high-def titles as part of its video-streaming service for subscribers—on home video players as well as PCs—Amazon has finally rolled out the first 500 HD movies and TV programs for its Video on Demand service. Among the initial films Amazon is offering as a la carte rentals are Frost/Nixon and Twilight.

April 21, 2009 by in Amazon

Amazon.com knocks $500 off $7k Mitsubishi LaserVue HDTV. Will anyone buy it now?

Amazon.com knocks $500 off $7k Mitsubishi LaserVue HDTV. Will anyone buy it now?

After delaying the release for some time, Mitsubishi finally rolled out its laser-based HDTV last fall, though the timing for sets using the new technology and carrying those first-generation price tags wasn't exactly optimal. In the era of easy credit, maybe some reckless spenders would score a home equity loan and drop $7,000 for a 65-inch TV that's using lasers and offering performance that could compete with top plasmas and LCDs.

July 6, 2009 by in Amazon