/>
X

10 strange uses for 3D printing (photos)

Revolutionary 3D printing may be just that - but some companies have put the technology to strange uses.
|
charlie-osborne.jpg
|
Topic: Innovation
6.png
1 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Clone yourself as a doll

A shop in Toyko, Japan, is offering an unsual product made possible through 3D printing -- a doll-size replica of .. yourself.

Well, at least the head.

The Clone Factory will shoot fully dimensional mages of you, input the information into programming software, and produce a replica doll-head for you through 3D printing. Apparently, these dolls are popular for weddings -- mini-me on the cake, anyone? 

It will only set you back $1,800 a time.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
1.png
2 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

A 3D replica of your fetus for your very own

Japanese firm Fasotec, in collaboration with Parkside Hiroo Ladies Clinic in Mintao-ku, Tokyo, have come up with a product to fill the niche for delighted to-be patents to own a replica, 3D-printed fetus of their soon-to-be-born bundle of joy.

Called "Shape of the Angel", the 90×60x40mm miniature fetus is created through an MRI scan, and then the image is given dimensional shape through 3D software. Once this is complete, clear resin is used for the "mother's body". The position, posture and appearance are an exact replica from the MRI scan image.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
10.png
3 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Google's 3D, printed pasta

At Google's Mountain View headquarters, Chef Bernard Faucher has been taking food creativity to the next level -- through 3D printing.

Faucher uses a 3D printer -- while controlling temperature and time manually -- to create customized food. At the moment, pasta and vegetables are hot on the menu.

The chef says that it allows him to produce food with "a very distinct and customisable shape".

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
2.png
4 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

The printable gun

First discovered on the AR-15.com website, the world's 'first' printed gun was assembled by merging the body of a normal .22 caliber pistol with printed components.

The printed, plastic parts of the gun -- a lower receiver used in AR-15 assault rifles -- was tested through a successful 200-round stint achieved without complications.

The gun may have only included one component, but the lower receiver is the part which allows the gun to fire.

Your own blueprint can be downloaded.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
3.png
5 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

3D printing and art collide

SaGa Design and Holographics teamed up to create artwork called "Omniscient Siri".

The 3D-printed representation of the popular iOS voice assistant was developed to "forces the user to interact with Siri instead of tapping on the screen to engage commands", according to the design team.

This piece of artwork, among others, was showcased at the recent 3D Print Show in London.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
4.png
6 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

The "Shoe Burger"

Print your shoe.. and eat it.

A member of the Shapeways community, Tristan Bethe, decided on a novel way to win a food competition at work. Using a 3D printer, he scanned his shoe, and created a silicon mold from the image. Afterwards, bread mix and an oven resulted in a baked shoe -- which became part of a new burger design.

For those with a sweet tooth, you could always ask Bethe for the recipe in his following chocolate shoe creation.  

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
5.png
7 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Chow down on a 3D version of your brain.

After becoming a test subject for a new kind of confectionery, Andy Millns took a hefty bite out of his brain.

Developed and produced from an MRI scan of his brain, 3D tech company Inition created a mold using a 3D printer -- and then made a chocolate mini-replica of the organ.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
7.png
8 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

The printed racecar

A team of engineers in Belgium have created a racer called the Areion. Using a process called "mammoth stereolithography" that prints out large, custom objects, the team constructed a fully-printed 3D chassis for their car.

The car is able to reach a top speed of 88mph, going from 0 to 62mph in 3.2 seconds. 50-volt lithium batteries power the racer, sending charge to an 85kw motor. Double-A carbon wishbone suspension, a bio-composite electric drivetrain and composite racing seat bring the weight of the car to 617 pounds.

A printed nozzle and diffuser keep the motor cool, and a fan behind the radiator draws in air on the left. In the right side of the shell, channels were developed and printed to create a cyclone effect which prevents water and dirt from becoming airborne and entering the engine.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
8.png
9 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

For the carnivores: Printed meat?

The Thiel Foundation is investing in a new company that wants to develop 3D printing technology to the point of producing 3D printed meat products.

Columbia, Missouri-based startup Modern Meadow is going to receive $350,000 to research and improve "bioprinting". Focusing first on leather products, if their research proves successful, the company will then move on to the edible meat replacement industry.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
9.png
10 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Printable, 3D clothes?

Continuum Fashions has created what the company claims as the "world's first ready-to-wear, completely 3D-printed article of clothing".

Called the N12 bikini, named after the material it is made from, Nylon 12, the product's components are all made from 3D printing. Without any sewing, the bikini's closures are all designed so they can simply snap together.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com

Related Galleries

Polestar 2 gallery tour: It's electrifying!
img-8843.jpg

Related Galleries

Polestar 2 gallery tour: It's electrifying!

34 Photos
First Look: Samsung's Galaxy Z Flip 3 [pictures]
01-001ef-gf711t-001-front-navy-210719-h.jpg

Related Galleries

First Look: Samsung's Galaxy Z Flip 3 [pictures]

26 Photos
Remote working, programming languages, artificial intelligence, and more: ZDNet's research roundup
gartnerhypeai2020.png

Related Galleries

Remote working, programming languages, artificial intelligence, and more: ZDNet's research roundup

10 Photos
Pitfalls to Avoid when Interpreting Machine Learning Models
1-bad-model-generalization.jpg

Related Galleries

Pitfalls to Avoid when Interpreting Machine Learning Models

8 Photos
Toshiba laptops through the ages
screenshot-2020-08-11-at-11-52-27.png

Related Galleries

Toshiba laptops through the ages

11 Photos
Innovative projects now online to combat coronavirus outbreak
7.jpg

Related Galleries

Innovative projects now online to combat coronavirus outbreak

7 Photos
Top programming languages, 5G worries, cloud computing, and more: Research round-up
gsa-status-of-5g-by-country-end-2019.jpg

Related Galleries

Top programming languages, 5G worries, cloud computing, and more: Research round-up

12 Photos