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Amazon Kindle Graphite (3G+Wi-Fi) 2010 Teardown

In 2010, Amazon released a thinner, faster Kindle e-book reader. Bill Detwiler cracks open the Kindle Graphite (3G+Wi-Fi) in this teardown gallery.
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In Summer 2010, Amazon released an updated Kindle reading device. Amazon dropped the Kindle's price to $139 (3G only) and $189 (3G+Wi-Fi). The new device has an improved display, more storage, and offers faster page turns. The redesigned Kindle is also thinner and lighter.
Follow along as Bill Detwiler cracks open the Kindle Graphite (2010).
Checkout Bill's teardown gallery of the original Amazon Kindle and see how far the electronic reader has come.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Under the Kindle Graphite (2010), you'll find the product documentation and power cable.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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The power cable on the Kindle Graphite (2010) is identical to the one used on the Kindle DX (Graphite).
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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According to Amazon, the redesigned Kindle (2010) is 21 percent smaller and 15 percent lighter than the previous Kindle, yet still features a 6-inch display.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Except for the speaker ports, there's not much to see on the back of the Kindle Graphite (2010).
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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At the top of the device's back panel are two speaker ports.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Along the bottom (from left to right) are the power switch, USB/power port, microphone, headphone jack, and volume up/down button.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Along the left side are the two connector ports for a case and the edges of the Previous Page and Next Page buttons.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Along the right side are the edges of the Previous Page and Next Page buttons.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Compared to previous Kindles, the keypad on the Kindle Graphite (2010) is more compact and has a redesigned 5-way controller.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Earlier in 2010, Amazon also released a redesigned Kindle DX--the Kindle's larger sibling. The Kindle DX (right) retails for $379.
Check out Bill's teardown of the Kindle DX (Graphite) 2010.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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The back of the Kindle DX (2010) has a metal plate and plastic RF window on the top.
The Kindle Graphite (2010)'s case is all plastic, which actually made disassembling the device much easier.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Using a very thin metal blade or plastic spudger, you can pry the back panel away from the from of the case.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Once you've loosened one side of the panel, the other side should come free with a little wiggling.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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With the back panel removed, we get our first look inside the Kindle Graphite (2010).
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Unlike the Kindle DX Graphite (2010), the Kindle Graphite (2010)'s back panel is all plastic.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Our first step in dissecting the Kindle Graphite (2010) will be removing the battery.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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The battery is held in place with two Phillips screws. I used a Phillips #00 screwdriver to remove all the screws inside the Kindle Graphite (2010). With the screws removed, you can lift the battery away from the main logic board.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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The Kindle Graphite (2010) has a 3.7V, 1750mAh (6.5Wh) Li-ion battery. The type number is 170-1032-00, and the model number is GP-S10-346392-0100.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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The contacts are found on the back of the battery along with more markings.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Between the battery and the main logic board, are two dome-shaped, metal washers. Be careful not to lose these when removing the battery.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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The battery was easy to remove and is definitely user-replaceable--even for those with limited technical skill.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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The 3G wireless card is attached to the case with two Phillips #00 screws. To removed the card, you'll need to remove the screws and disconnect the antenna cable.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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With the screws removed and the antenna cable disconnected, you can left the card away from the main logic board.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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The Kindle Graphite (2010) uses an AnyDATA DTP-600W HSPA mini PCI-E module for wireless 3G connectivity. This is the same card used by the Kindle DX Graphite (2010).
According to AnyDATA documentation the DTP-600W "operates globally on tri-band UMTS 850/1900/2100 wireless networks as well as quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE 850/900/1800/1900 networks."
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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With the wireless card and battery removed, we can see more of the gray panel that lies between most of the internal components and the E-Ink display.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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A small black, plastic bezel is mounted behind one of the Kindle Graphite (2010)'s case catch. It is held in place with four Phillips #00 screws.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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This underside of the catch bezel has metal contacts that tell the Kindle a case is connected.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Before we can remove the main logic board from the support structure underneath and the front half of the case, we must remove one more "silver" screw and several dark-colored screws.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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There are eight dark-colored screws that hold the Kindle Graphite (2010)'s main logic board to the support structure underneath and the front half of the case.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Before removing the logic board, we'll also need to disconnect all the cables.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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The ribbon cable for the Kindle Graphite (2010)'s keypad is connected to the main logic board with a gated connector. Gently lift up the gate and pull the cable free.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Next to be disconnected is the Kindle Graphite (2010)'s E-Ink display connector. This connector should pop loose with a little force.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Next, disconnect the internal speaker cable.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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There are two very small ribbon cables (one on each side) for the two pairs of Previous Page and Next Page buttons. You'll need to lift the connector gates and pull the cables loose on both.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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When lifting the main logic board away from the front half of the case, you'll need to lift it out from under this bent metal sprint on the power switch.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Tilting the Kindle Graphite (2010)'s main logic board up from the top makes it easier to remove.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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With the Kindle Graphite (2010)'s logic board removed, we can see the gray support structure underneath, which serves as the backing for the E-Ink display and contains the internal components for the keypad.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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At this point, we can see a chip or two on the main logic board, but we'll need to remove the metal shields to see more.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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There's not much to talk about on the back of the Kindle Graphite (2010)'s main logic board.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Using a thin metal blade or plastic spudger, you should be able to pop the shields off the Kindle Graphite (2010)'s main logic board.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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This picture shows the following chips:
Freescale ARM 11-based i.MX353 multimedia applications processor -- Part number: MCIMX353DJQ5C (partially obscured)
Samsung K4X2G323PB-8GC3 DRAM
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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This pictures shows the following chips:
Samsung 4GB moviNand storage chip -- KLM4G1DEHM-B101
EPSON KCRE7000 F10203TYV E-Ink display controller
Atheros AR6102 ROCm WLAN chip (AR6102G-BM20)
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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The Kindle Graphite (2010) uses the Wolfson Microelectronics WM8960G stereo codec.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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With the main logic board removed, we can see the support structure underneath. It is held to the front case panel with several Phillips screws.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Once the screws are removed, you can gently lift the internal structure away from the front panel.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Behind the internal support structure is the E-Ink display and the back of the Kindle Graphite (2010)'s keypad.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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At the top of the internal support structure is the speaker assembly, which is attached to the structure with adhesive.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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On the front of the internal support are the actual contacts for the keypad buttons.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Here's the Kindle Graphite (2010), or Kindle 3 if you prefer, completely disassembled. Compared to the first two Kindle versions and the Kindle DX, this device was much easier to crack open. In fact, it has many user-serviceable part--such as the battery. Just remember that taking this e-reader apart will likely void your warranty.
Photo credit: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic

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