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CES 2014: The smart, and not-so-smart product showcase

CES is a showcase for new technology and innovative products. What are the best and worst this year?
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1 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNET

Monitor your meat in a smart way

I'm a terrible cook, especially when it comes to meat. It's either raw or overdone,  and so devices like the iGrill2 Smart Meat Thermometer -- anything to prevent people suffering my culinary efforts -- catch my eye.

The iGrill2 allows you to monitor the temperature of your food via an app and Bluetooth from up to 150 feet away. Featuring an LED display, magnetic mounting, probe ports and a 150-hour battery life, the gadget lets you track up to four different temperatures in order to produce better meals and avoid overcooking. 

Via: iDevices 

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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2 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNET

Pebble watches

Pebble, maker of smartwatches that have similar functions to mobile phones and their applications, released a number of new products at CES 2014.
Not only has the firm opened an app store dedicated to software suitable for the wearable technology, but the Pebble Steel, a premium version of the watch, can now be ordered. 
Via: ZDNet
This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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3 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNET

A baby onesie powered by Intel

We saw a number of companies touting wearables this year, and the Mimo Baby is no exception. 

Made by Rest Devices and powered by Intel chips, the Mimo Baby is a onesie equipped with two green stripes that hold respiratory sensors. In addition, the clothing comes with a turtle-shaped clip that monitors the child's body position, activity rates and temperature. 

Once connected through an Android or iOS smartphone app, parents can see this data to check everything is ok -- warning parents if rapid changes or problems occur while keeping their child warm. 

It's certainly not a bad idea, and could help parents pick up problems before they become serious.

Via: Engadget 

Image credit: Mimo Baby

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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4 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNET

360 degree camera shots, all at the same time

The Panomo camera ball, showcased at CES, is a ball equipped with multiple 2-megapixel cameras. 
Once thrown in the air, the ball can automatically take multiple shots at different angles -- just make sure you're ready to catch.
As a novelty, and as a photographer, I think this is a cool gadget, but has few actual applications. It would be fun to use for the sake of it, but would most likely end up gathering dust in my cupboard for most gigs -- if I didn't break it first.
Via: CNET
This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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5 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNET

Smart tech that tracks your teeth

A step away from tablets, the Kolibree toothbrush is yet another product that taps into the mobility trend -- by hooking up your dental hygiene to your smartphone.

The Bluetooth-enabled toothbrush connects with an app on your mobile device in order to rank you on how well you're scrubbing those pearly whites.  You can also track other members of your family to see how well they've brushed up in the morning -- perhaps useful (or overkill) for parents trying to make sure their kids remember to clean up after breakfast. 

It might be innovative and different, but that does not mean such a product is going to appeal to the consumer market.


This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com

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6 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNET

Sun-tracking jewelry

Netamo's "June" bracelet taps into the world of wearable technology, tracking how long you've been exposed to the suns' rays -- and whether the wearer needs to take action to stay safe. 

The bracelet monitors your exposure to UV rays, and if you've been exposed to too much lying in the sun or being outside, will warn you so you can cover up or apply more sunscreen. 

Read moreNetatmo

Image credit: Netamo

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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7 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNET

Makerbot's new 3D printers

In the flurry of mobile devices and wearable technology, 3D printing has not been forgotten.

MakerBot announced the MakerBot Replicator Mini, a 3D printer suitable for use at home. Priced at $1375, the printer is cheap enough for enthusiasts who can't shell out for professional options like the MakerBot Replicator or MakerBot Z18. 

In addition, MakerBot plans to open an online store for printing fans to purchase and download blueprints for 3D objects. 

Via: SmartPlanet

Image credit: Makerbot

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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8 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNET

Business-based smart glasses

Epson's Moverio BT200 "smart glasses" were also on show this year, but unlike Google Glass, are targeted towards the business market.

The Moverio glasses are an augmented reality projection system comprising of two parts: an LCD-based projection lens system and optical light guide in each side of the glasses, which project digital content in the wearer's field of vision on a transparent display at 960x540 resolution. 

The glasses run on Android, have up to six hours of battery life and built-in Wi-Fi. 

Moverio will be shipped from March 2014 and come with a $699.99 price tag. 

Via: Epson

Image credit: Epson

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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9 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNET

Tinke health sensors

The Tinke sensor device for mobile gadgets allows users to keep track of their heart rate, breathing patterns and blood oxygen level. Once activated by touch, these metrics -- as well as heart rate variability -- are measured. The firm says that the sensor is best used daily, in order to alert users to any rapid changes in their health. 

Via: CNET

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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10 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNET

Fitness tracking

Notch is one of many fitness-related wearable devices unveiled at CES this year, but is also an interesting prototype due to the link of ten sensors mounted around a wearer's body -- allowing the gadget to track complex motions.

The sensor network, paired with a mobile app, allows the user to review their movements. For example, a footballer could review their kicks and potentially refine their techniques based on such data. 

Via: The Guardian

Image credit: Notch

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com

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