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Cracking Open: Amazon Kindle Touch (2011)

Bill Detwiler cracks open the 2011 Amazon Kindle Touch. Inside this e-book reader, he found hardware from Freescale, SanDisk, and Samsung.
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At the same time Amazon launched the Kindle Fire tablet, it also introduced three new Kindle e-ink readers--the Kindle, Kindle Touch, and Kindle Touch 3G. I've already cracked open the Kindle Fire and 2011 Kindle. All that's left is the Kindle Touch.

For a more in-depth review of the 2011 Kindle's internal hardware, check out my article, "Amazon Kindle Touch (2011) teardown: Replaceable battery, Neonode touch screen."

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

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The Kindle Touch has a 6" (diagonal) E Ink multi-touch display with a resolution of 600 x 800 pixels (167 ppi) and 16-level grayscale. The device has a The e-book reader measures 4.7" W x 6.8" H x 0.4" D and weighs 7.5 ounces (213 grams).

As of this writing, the 2011 Kindle Touch is available for $99.00 (with Special Offers) and $139 (without Special Offers). The 3G version of the Touch is available for $149 (with Special Offers) and $189 (without Special Offers).

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The Kindle Touch has two internal speakers.

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Along the bottom edge of the Kindle Touch are a 3.5mm headphone jack, Micro- port, and a power button.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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Using a thin metal blade, I popped loose the Kindle Touch's back cover.

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Once loose, I slide the back cover down and away from the Kindle Touch.

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Lifting the cover off the Kindle Touch, we get our first look inside the Amazon e-book reader.

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Using a Phillips #00 screwdriver bit, I removed the screws holding the Kindle Touch's Li-Ion battery in place.

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After remving the battery, I removed several screws that hold the Kindle Touch's metal, outer case to the display assembly.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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I used a hair dryer to heat the adhesive that holds the Kindle Touch's front molding to the display assembly. At the same time, I used a thin metal blade to pry the molding loose.

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Several screws, located on the front of the device, hold the Kindle Touch's metal case to the front display assembly.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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With all the screws removed, I lifted the Kindle Touch's metal case away from the display assembly.

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Next, I removed the Kindle Touch's motherboard screws.

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Being a Wi-Fi only Kindle Touch, this unit has a black, plastic spacer in place of a cellular card.

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A clear plastic bracket is attached to the display assembly with metal tape and to the motherboard with weak adhesive. Using a thin metal blade, I separated the bracket from the motherboard, but left it attached to the display assembly.

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Prime View International (PVI) 6-inch ED060SCG E Ink Display

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800MHz ARM Cortex-A8 Freescale Semiconductor i.MX508 Multimedia Applications Processor with integrated Electronic Paper Display Controller (MCIMX508CVK8B)

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Like the 2011 Barnes & Noble Nook, the Kindle Touch uses the Neonode zForce touch screen system. This technology uses a series of transmitters and receivers (likely IR) to create a grid above the display. As an object, such as your finger, passes through the grid, the system translates its movement into actions on the display.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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