/>
X

Cracking Open the 2011 Barnes & Noble Nook e-book reader (Wi-Fi)

Bill Detwiler cracks open the 2011 Barnes & Noble Nook. Inside the touchscreen e-book reader, he found chips from TI, SanDisk, Samsung, and Lattice.
6244760.jpg
1 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

In May 2011, Barnes and Noble released a redesigned Nook e-book reader. The new Nook is thinner and lighter than its predecessor--theNook 1st edition. It has a 6" touchscreen, 2GB of built-in storage, Wi-Fi connectivity, and can run up to two months on a full battery charge. But, it lacks audio support, 3G, or a Web browser. Follow along as I crack open the 2011 Nook e-book reader.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244761.jpg
2 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

As of this writing, the 2011 Nook has a suggested retail price of $139 (US). You can still purchase the Nook 1st edition for $119 (Wi-Fi) and $169 (Wi-Fi + 3G) and the Nook Color for $249.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244762.jpg
3 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

The 2011 NOOK has the following technical specifications:

  • Processor: 800MHz Texas Instruments OMAP 3
  • Internal Storage: 2GB
  • External Storage: MicroSD card slot (supports up to 32GB card)
  • Display: 6" Pearl e-ink screen with Neonode zForce touchscreen
  • Battery: 3.7V 1530mAh, 5.66Wh Li-Ion (up to two months of battery life)
  • Ports: Micro USB
  • Operating system: Andriod 2.1 (modified - no support for Andriod apps)
  • Wireless: 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244763.jpg
4 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

The 2011 Nook supports EPUB, PDF, ADobce DRM e-book formats and can read JPEG, GIF, PNG, and BMP graphic files. It weighs 7.48 ounces and measures 6.5" (H) x 5" (W) x 0.47" (D).

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244764.jpg
5 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244765.jpg
6 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244766.jpg
7 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244767.jpg
8 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244768.jpg
9 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244769.jpg
10 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244770.jpg
11 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244771.jpg
12 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244772.jpg
13 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244773.jpg
14 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244774.jpg
15 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244775.jpg
16 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244776.jpg
17 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244777.jpg
18 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244778.jpg
19 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244779.jpg
20 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244780.jpg
21 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244781.jpg
22 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244782.jpg
23 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244783.jpg
24 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244784.jpg
25 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244785.jpg
26 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244786.jpg
27 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244787.jpg
28 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244788.jpg
29 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244789.jpg
30 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244790.jpg
31 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244791.jpg
32 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244792.jpg
33 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244793.jpg
34 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Interestingly, the 2011 Nook has the same Texas Instruments OMAP3621 applications processor as the Nook Color. Perhaps you can hack the Nook to run Andriod apps, as you can do on the Nook Color.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244794.jpg
35 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244795.jpg
36 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244796.jpg
37 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244797.jpg
38 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244798.jpg
39 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244799.jpg
40 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244800.jpg
41 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244801.jpg
42 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244802.jpg
43 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6244803.jpg
44 of 44 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

For the technically inclined, the 2011 Barnes & Noble Nook should be a snap to open and repair.

A single Torx T5 screw secures the back cover. And, once the screw is removed, the cover slides off. Once inside the case, the Nook's internal hardware is readily accessible.

Despite Barnes & Noble claiming that the battery is not user-replaceable, it is not soldered to the main PCB. Provided you can get a replacement battery, the job should take more than 10 minutes.

I was also intrested to see Barnes & Noble use the same TI OMAP3621 application processor that they use in the Nook Color. I'll have to try hacking the new Nook to run Android apps.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

Related Galleries

Say hello to the early days of web browsers
netscape-shutterstock-189041855.jpg

Related Galleries

Say hello to the early days of web browsers

9 Photos
TRENDnet TUC-ET5G USB-C 3.1 to 5GBASE-T Ethernet adapter
TRENDnet TUC-ET5G

Related Galleries

TRENDnet TUC-ET5G USB-C 3.1 to 5GBASE-T Ethernet adapter

20 Photos
Anker PowerExpand 8-in-1 USB-C hub
Anker PowerExpand 8-in-1 USB-C hub

Related Galleries

Anker PowerExpand 8-in-1 USB-C hub

7 Photos
Netgear Orbi RBK752 tri-band Gigabit Wi-Fi 6 mesh
Netgear Orbi RBK752

Related Galleries

Netgear Orbi RBK752 tri-band Gigabit Wi-Fi 6 mesh

8 Photos
Plugable UD-CA1A USB-C dock
Plugable UD-CA1A USB-C docking station

Related Galleries

Plugable UD-CA1A USB-C dock

7 Photos
OWC Thunderbolt 3 10G Ethernet Adapter
OWC Thunderbolt 3 10G Ethernet Adapter

Related Galleries

OWC Thunderbolt 3 10G Ethernet Adapter

4 Photos
Plugable super-fast 2.5Gbps Ethernet adapter (in pictures)
Plugable 2.5Gbps Ethernet adapter

Related Galleries

Plugable super-fast 2.5Gbps Ethernet adapter (in pictures)

14 Photos