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Diversity in America: Ethnicity in the top 50 U.S. cities, mapped

A fascinating look at the vibrant -- and often separated -- communities that make up a nation's 50 most populous cities.
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By Andrew Nusca, Former editor on
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1 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

Prelude: The United States of America

This is a map of the entire United States. Hawaii is inset in the bottom left corner; Alaska is inset in the bottom right corner.

Demographer Dustin Cable plotted on a map dots for each of the 308,745,538 people represented in the 2010 United States census. He also color-coded those dots based on self-reported ethnicity.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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2 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 1: New York City

This is a map of New York, New York, the most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 8.3 million people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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3 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 2: Los Angeles

This is a map of Los Angeles, California, the second most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 3.9 million people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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4 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 3: Chicago

This is a map of Chicago, Illinois, the third most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 2.7 million people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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5 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 4: Houston

This is a map of Houston, Texas, the fourth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 2.2 million people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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6 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 5: Philadelphia

This is a map of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the fifth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 1.5 million people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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7 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 6: Phoenix

This is a map of Phoenix, Arizona, the sixth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 1.5 million people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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8 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 7: San Antonio

This is a map of San Antonio, Texas, the seventh most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 1.4 million people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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9 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 8: San Diego

This is a map of San Diego, California, the eighth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 1.3 million people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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10 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 9: Dallas

This is a map of Dallas, Texas, the ninth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 1.2 million people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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11 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 10: San Jose

This is a map of San Jose, California, the tenth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 1 million people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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12 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 11: Austin

This is a map of Austin, Texas, the eleventh most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 842,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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13 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 12: Jacksonville

This is a map of Jacksonville, Florida, the twelfth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 837,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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14 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 13: Indianapolis

This is a map of Indianapolis, Indiana, the thirteenth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 835,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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15 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 14: San Francisco

This is a map of San Francisco, California, the fourteenth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 826,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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16 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 15: Columbus

This is a map of Columbus, Ohio, the fifteenth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 810,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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17 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 16: Fort Worth

This is a map of Fort Worth, Texas, the sixteenth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 778,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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18 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 17: Charlotte

This is a map of Charlotte, North Carolina, the seventeenth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 775,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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19 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 18: Detroit

This is a map of Detroit, Michigan, the eighteenth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 701,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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20 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 19: El Paso

This is a map of El Paso, Texas, the nineteenth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 673,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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21 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 20: Memphis

This is a map of Memphis, Tennessee, the twentieth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 655,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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22 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 21: Boston

This is a map of Boston, Massachusetts, the twenty-first most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 637,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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23 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 22: Seattle

This is a map of Seattle, Washington, the twenty-second most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 635,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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24 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 23: Denver

This is a map of Denver, Colorado, the twenty-third most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 634,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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25 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 24: Washington, D.C.

This is a map of Washington, D.C., the twenty-fourth most populous city in the United States -- and its capital city! -- with an estimated 632,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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26 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 25: Nashville

This is a map of Nashville, Tennessee, the twenty-fifth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 625,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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27 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 26: Baltimore

This is a map of Baltimore, Maryland, the twenty-sixth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 621,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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28 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 27: Louisville

This is a map of Louisville, Kentucky, the twenty-seventh most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 605,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
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29 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 28: Portland

This is a map of Portland, Oregon, the twenty-eighth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 603,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-29-oklahomacity-1094x840.jpg
30 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 29: Oklahoma City

This is a map of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, the twenty-ninth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 599,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-30-milwaukee-1094x840.jpg
31 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 30: Milwaukee

This is a map of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the thirtieth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 599,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-31-lasvegas-1094x840.jpg
32 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 31: Las Vegas

This is a map of Las Vegas, Nevada, the thirty-first most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 596,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-32-albuquerque-1094x840.jpg
33 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 32: Albuquerque

This is a map of Albuquerque, New Mexico, the thirty-second most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 555,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-33-tucson-1094x840.jpg
34 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 33: Tucson

This is a map of Tucson, Arizona, the thirty-third most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 524,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-34-fresno-1094x840.jpg
35 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 34: Fresno

This is a map of Fresno, California, the thirty-fourth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 506,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-35-sacramento-1094x840.jpg
36 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 35: Sacramento

This is a map of Sacramento, California, the thirty-fifth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 476,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-36-longbeachca-1094x840.jpg
37 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 36: Long Beach

This is a map of Long Beach, California, the thirty-sixth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 468,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-37-kansascitymo-1094x840.jpg
38 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 37: Kansas City

This is a map of Kansas City, Missouri, the thirty-seventh most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 464,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-38-mesaaz-1094x840.jpg
39 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 38: Mesa

This is a map of Mesa, Arizona, the thirty-eighth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 452,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-39-virginiabeach-1094x840.jpg
40 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 39: Virginia Beach

This is a map of Virginia Beach, Virginia, the thirty-ninth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 447,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-40-atlanta-1094x840.jpg
41 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 40: Atlanta

This is a map of Atlanta, Georgia, the fortieth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 444,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-41-coloradosprings-1094x840.jpg
42 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 41: Colorado Springs

This is a map of Colorado Springs, Colorado, the forty-first most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 432,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-42-raleigh-1094x840.jpg
43 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 42: Raleigh

This is a map of Raleigh, North Carolina, the forty-second most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 423,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-43-omaha-1094x840.jpg
44 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 43: Omaha

This is a map of Omaha, Nebraska, the forty-third most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 422,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-44-miami-1094x840.jpg
45 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 44: Miami

This is a map of Miami, Florida, the forty-fourth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 414,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-45-oakland-1094x840.jpg
46 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 45: Oakland

This is a map of Oakland, California, the forty-fifth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 401,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-46-tulsa-1094x840.jpg
47 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 46: Tulsa

This is a map of Tulsa, Oklahoma, the forty-sixth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 394,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-47-minneapolis-1094x840.jpg
48 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 47: Minneapolis

This is a map of Minneapolis, Minnesota, the forty-seventh most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 393,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-48-cleveland-1094x840.jpg
49 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 48: Cleveland

This is a map of Cleveland, Ohio, the forty-eighth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 391,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-49-wichita-1094x840.jpg
50 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 49: Wichita

This is a map of Wichita, Kansas, the forty-ninth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 386,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com
ethnicity-map-usa-50-arlingtontx-1094x840.jpg
51 of 51 Andrew Nusca/ZDNet

No. 50: Arlington

This is a map of Arlington, Texas, the fiftieth most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 376,000 people.

In this map, you can identify geographic distribution, population denesity and ethnic diversity. The data used to plot the points on this map comes from the 2010 U.S. census, which is publicly available online. Demographer Dustin Cable, a researcher at the the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, modeled the project on a previous Massachusetts Institute of Technology effort plotting population density with dots that represent individuals. Here, he takes it one further by color-coding the dots for self-reported ethnicity.

Key: One dot equals one person. Blue dots represent a reported "White" ethnicity; green dots represent "Black"; red dots represent "Asian"; orange dots represent "Hispanic" or Latino; brown dots represent "Native American," "multi-racial" and "other."

To zoom in on an area not included here, visit the interactive version hosted by the Cooper Center.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com

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