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Huawei mobile broadband roadshow: pics

Chinese network vendor Huawei today detailed its plans for long-term evolution (LTE) technology, demonstrating an LTE network within a modded freight container.

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Topic: Telcos
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1 of 9 Josh Taylor/ZDNet

(Credit: Josh Taylor/ZDNet Australia)

The Huawei mobile broadband roadshow made a pit stop in Sydney today at Randwick Racecourse. Inside the shipping container is a fully contained LTE network.

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2 of 9 Josh Taylor/ZDNet

(Credit: Josh Taylor/ZDNet Australia)

Huawei demonstrated the broadcast of the 3D film Resident Evil: Afterlife over its own Time Division Duplex (TDD) LTE network operating in the 2.6GHz spectrum band. The average speed was roughly 10 megabits per second (Mbps), peaking at 21Mbps

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3 of 9 Josh Taylor/ZDNet

(Credit: Josh Taylor/ZDNet Australia)

Huawei designed these RF (radio frequency) units for base stations to be exactly 15kg, to cater for a network roll-out for Vodafone in Germany. Huawei said that if the unit had weighed any more than 15kg, more than one employee would be required to install it under Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) laws, and this would ultimately add to the cost of deploying the new network.

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4 of 9 Josh Taylor/ZDNet

(Credit: Josh Taylor/ZDNet Australia)

Huawei's RF unit in action in the container.

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5 of 9 Josh Taylor/ZDNet

(Credit: Josh Taylor/ZDNet Australia)

A subscriber database contains subscriber information within the RF unit's cell.

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6 of 9 Josh Taylor/ZDNet

(Credit: Josh Taylor/ZDNet Australia)

This is a unified serving node. A serving node connects radio services to IP traffic; unified serving nodes are so called because they are compatible with multiple mobile technologies, in this case 2G, 3G and LTE traffic.

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7 of 9 Josh Taylor/ZDNet

(Credit: Josh Taylor/ZDNet Australia)

Huawei's macro indoor base station radio.

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8 of 9 Josh Taylor/ZDNet

(Credit: Josh Taylor/ZDNet Australia)

This IP multimedia subsystem is responsible for functions, such as core control, data storage, network authentication, roaming and quality of service (QoS).

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9 of 9 Josh Taylor/ZDNet

(Credit: Josh Taylor/ZDNet Australia)

Optical transmission equipment and IP platform technology. Huawei is seeking to give telcos greater oversight of their networks so that they can both manage network traffic efficiently and be able to give end users greater control over the speeds and services that they receive on the LTE network. One feature demonstrated was the ability for the network to prompt a user watching a low-quality YouTube video on their smartphone to upgrade to a higher-speed account so that they could watch the video in higher quality.

Optus CEO Paul O'Sullivan has previously indicated that the telco will seek to market LTE as a premium service to customers.

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