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JB Hi-Fi teases cloud music service: photos

JB Hi-Fi recently announced plans to open a cloud music store, and now a new video has landed teasing the Australian-listening public longing for a local cloud music platform. Take a look at our sneak peek of the design and pricing.
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Topic: Cloud
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1 of 9 Luke Hopewell/ZDNet

(Screenshot by Luke Hopewell/ZDNet Australia)

The opening title of the video shows JB's yellow logo for the music service, which CEO Terry Smart said will be able to stream music to anyone, anywhere, on any platform, so long as they're in Australia.

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2 of 9 Luke Hopewell/ZDNet

(Screenshot by Luke Hopewell/ZDNet Australia)

The landing page boasts a search function, featured artists, chart listings and has a now playing bar in the bottom of the page. From the brief video teaser, it appears that users can play albums just by clicking on the album cover.

At a cursory glance, the service appears to have taken several design cues from the now infamous free music service, Grooveshark.

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3 of 9 Luke Hopewell/ZDNet

(Screenshot by Luke Hopewell/ZDNet Australia)

JB Hi-Fi will also offer a discovery feature that allows users to select a genre and listen to music it has previously prepared.

The Discover page could even be likened to Microsoft's Metro UI design featured in Windows 8.

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4 of 9 Luke Hopewell/ZDNet

(Screenshot by Luke Hopewell/ZDNet Australia)

Users can also create a mix tape to share with their friends, or listen to random mix tapes created and shared by other users.

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5 of 9 Luke Hopewell/ZDNet

(Screenshot by Luke Hopewell/ZDNet Australia)

Tracks are displayed by artist, song and album in search results, with the now playing bar still cemented to the base of the page.

JB Hi-Fi's landing page for the Now service shows pricing from $6.67 per month, bringing the price for the service to just over $80 per year. That makes it a real competitor among the three major music streaming services on the market at the moment: Microsoft's Zune Pass ($11.99/month, $119.90/year), Sony's Music Unlimited Service ($4.99/month for basic, $12.99/month for premium) and Samsung's Music Hub ($9.99/month for one device only or $14.99/month for five devices).

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6 of 9 Luke Hopewell/ZDNet

(Screenshot by Luke Hopewell/ZDNet Australia)

JB Hi-Fi will also boast several social functions in a bid to take on other music social networks like Apple's Ping service. Here we see a user page displaying information like age, sex, location, username, music favourites, recently played tracks and mix tapes. It appears that users can also follow each other, á la Twitter.

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7 of 9 Luke Hopewell/ZDNet

(Screenshot by Luke Hopewell/ZDNet Australia)

Users can also join "Crowds" where they can share music among each other in what Now calls "a crowd of like-minded music lovers".

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8 of 9 Luke Hopewell/ZDNet

(Screenshot by Luke Hopewell/ZDNet Australia)

The artist page for singer-songwriter, Feist. The service plans to boast over 6 million songs by 100,000 various local and international artists. So far, we've been able to spot Jet, Silverchair, Pete Murray, Daft Punk, David Guetta, Deadmau5, Good Charlotte, Katy Perry, Empire of the Sun, MSTRKRFT, Foo Fighters and, most interestingly, Coldplay.

Coldplay and other artists recently kicked up a fuss over online music streaming, refusing to be apart of music platforms including Spotify, Rdio and MOG.

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9 of 9 Luke Hopewell/ZDNet

(Screenshot by Luke Hopewell/ZDNet Australia)

JB Hi-Fi said that it would release mobile apps for its Now platform in 2012 and has given us a first look at the minimalist interface. CEO Smart told ZDNet Australia that apps for Android, BlackBerry and Windows Phone 7 are in the works.

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