/>
X

Join or Sign In

Register for your free ZDNet membership or if you are already a member, sign in using your preferred method below.

Use your email Use Linkedin Use Facebook

Photos: Future tech at Microsoft Innovation day

From digital shopping lists, to the car that can teach itself to drive

|
zd-defaultauthor-tim-ferguson.jpg
|
Topic: Hardware
40150985-1-laser-car.jpg
1 of 9 Tim Ferguson/ZDNet

From digital shopping lists, to the car that can teach itself to drive

Microsoft hosted its fourth Innovation Day in Brussels this week with partner organisations showing off the tech wares they predict could take off in the near future.

This photo shows a system developed by the Microsoft Research team in Cambridge, where the car learns how to drive around a track within a computer game. With further work it's hoped it can be tested on real vehicles.

The three green laser lines measure time to impact to various objects, while the lines on the road show the route the car has taken previously which it uses to perfect its line.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson

40150985-2-digital-wall.jpg
2 of 9 Tim Ferguson/ZDNet

This is the Smart Board developed by the Living Tomorrow team along with Microsoft.

It's a large touchscreen with a range of widget-like apps designed to be used in the home.

This version is aimed at the kitchen and includes a stock checking application. When unpacking shopping you can scan items against the screen (using RFID) which notes which items are being brought in. You can then keep track of the items you have in stock.

It also has an application called Eco Track (top right) that measures how much carbon your house is producing at any one time.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson

40150985-3-shopping-list.jpg
3 of 9 Tim Ferguson/ZDNet

You can also interact with the Smart Board by using the touchscreen to write the names of items you want to check are in the house or need to be added to your shopping list.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson

40150985-4-health-mirror.jpg
4 of 9 Tim Ferguson/ZDNet

This is the Intelligent Mirror, also part of Living Tomorrow's vision of the home of the future.

Designed for people who need to closely monitor their health, the mirror displays heart rate and blood pressure - measured via the handle of a toothbrush - and includes reminders for taking medication.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson

40150985-5-3d-car.jpg
5 of 9 Tim Ferguson/ZDNet

This shows an application that projects images into real objects held in front of a camera. This is a car brochure (being held to the right of the screen) with a 3D image of the car it relates to being placed on top of the brochure on the screen.

You can change the car's colour by placing your finger on the appropriate parts of the brochure.

Developed by Virtual Events it's designed for use in marketing and in retailing.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson

40150985-6-fish-on-floor.jpg
6 of 9 Tim Ferguson/ZDNet

Also created by Virtual Events, this is a floor that reacts to your movements much like Microsoft's Surface technology.

On this app, the water moves when you place your foot on the image and the fish react to your movements by swimming away.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson

40150985-7-robot.jpg
7 of 9 Tim Ferguson/ZDNet

This is a robot developed by Robosoft, which can navigate by itself and be used for a variety of purposes, such as helping elderly people with daily tasks like cleaning.

It can also be used to allow healthcare workers to monitor patients and interact with them without visiting as frequently, or to provide social interactions for people who may not be able to leave the house as much as they would like.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson

40150985-8-map.jpg
8 of 9 Tim Ferguson/ZDNet

This shows an address-finding technology created by Microsoft Research developers in Bangalore, India.

Users can input general details of a location - such as street names or a particular landmark. The algorithms in the system then come up with likely locations and show them on the map with the closest matches listed first.

This is seen as particularly useful in India where exact addresses and locations are sometimes hard to pinpoint.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson

40150985-9-digital-white-board.jpg
9 of 9 Tim Ferguson/ZDNet

This is an interactive whiteboard developed by Smart Technologies

These are now widely used in schools, replacing the traditional black or whiteboard.

Teachers can create and save lesson slides while pupils can interact the board to answer questions - such as labelling a diagram in biology or set up an experiment.

This one shows a historical map of Europe put together by an Innovation Day visitor with related items placed over various geographical areas.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson

Related Galleries

Apple Watch Series 7: Unboxing and first impressions
Hello QWERTY keyboard

Related Galleries

Apple Watch Series 7: Unboxing and first impressions

First look at the YubiKey Bio
YubiKey Bio

Related Galleries

First look at the YubiKey Bio

Anker 20W Nano Pro charger (Anker 511 Charger)
Anker Nano Pro

Related Galleries

Anker 20W Nano Pro charger (Anker 511 Charger)

First Look: New Surface PCs include Android-based Duo 2 [in pictures]
thumbnail-72371d1d9eb043bcb3986b87c5b47dc7.jpg

Related Galleries

First Look: New Surface PCs include Android-based Duo 2 [in pictures]

Next-generation Amazon Kindle Paperwhite
Kindle Paperwhite Kids

Related Galleries

Next-generation Amazon Kindle Paperwhite

First look: iPhone 13 Apple event [in pictures]
california-streaming-2.jpg

Related Galleries

First look: iPhone 13 Apple event [in pictures]

Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 3, Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3, HP Elite Folio, and more: ZDNet's reviews roundup
hp-elite-dragonfly-g2.jpg

Related Galleries

Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 3, Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3, HP Elite Folio, and more: ZDNet's reviews roundup