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Photos: Historic PCs

At the Vintage Computer Festival, which played host to the Homebrew Computer Club's 30th anniversary, a look at yesterday's computers.
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1 of 10 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Chuck Colby

At the Vintage Computer Festival, which played host to the Homebrew Computer Club's 30th anniversary, Chuck Colby shows a display of what he describes as the first IBM clone motherboard, which he introduced to Homebrew in 1982.

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2 of 10 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Chuck Colby computer

Chuck Colby's company built and sold this portable, battery-powered computer running the Mac operating system in 1987, several years before Apple Computer produced its own laptop.

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3 of 10 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

WalkMac

Initially called the WalkMac (until Sony objected to the name), this portable weighed about 14.5 pounds and cost about $3,000 to $4,500 in the late 1980s and '90s. The Colby WalkMac included a simple, useful device that's missing from today's laptops: a handle.

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4 of 10 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

SWTPC 6800

The SWTPC 6800 was built by Southwest Technical Products. It cost $400 in kit form in 1976 and used a Motorola 6800 processor running at 1MHz.

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5 of 10 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

IMSAI 8080

The IMSAI 8080, popular with computer hobbyists in the late 1970s, played a central role in the 1983 movie "WarGames."

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6 of 10 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Compucolor II

The Compucolor II, introduced in 1977, featured a computer built into the chassis of a 13-inch television and is considered the first color personal computer. It used an Intel 8080A processor and accepted floppy disks through the door to the right of the screen.

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7 of 10 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

SBC6120

This SBC6120 is a functional replica of the DEC PDP-8 minicomputer.

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8 of 10 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Kenbak-1

The Kenbak-1 is considered the first personal computer.

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9 of 10 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Kenbak-1

When introduced in 1971, the Kenbak-1 cost $750. Only about 40 were sold before the company shut down two years later.

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10 of 10 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Kenbak-1

The Kenbak-1, which did not use a microprocessor, was marketed through Scientific American magazine.

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