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Six clicks: Six most amazingly cool geek projects

From the deepest reaches of our innermost existence to the farthest reaches of space, we bring you twisted projects, incredibly productions, and glass that goes "choo choo".
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1 of 7 David Gewirtz/ZDNet

Oh, how cool!

Sometimes I just get carried away clicking and clicking and clicking. If I find something amazingly cool, it just sucks me in. Since I'm a geek, the geekier they are, the cooler they are.

In this edition of Six Clicks, we'll take you from a home-built scanning electron microscope (yeah, you read that right) all the way to a hack that makes sure all the Web images viewed by anyone on your network are cats. Yep, now you know why I get sucked into these these. They're just neat.

So, without more blathering here on the first page, I present to you some dude who built his own electron microscope... because he could!

Previously on Six Clicks:

Six clicks: Great tips and tricks for Android

Six clicks: Single board computers: Banana Pi, Raspberry Pi, and more

Six Clicks: Insanely great Raspberry Pi devices you can build yourself

Six clicks: Weird tricks that will actually make you happier with Windows 8.1

Six Clicks: How do you keep track of all your passwords?

 

 

 

 

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2 of 7 David Gewirtz/ZDNet

DIY scanning electron microscope

The last big DIY project I attempted was getting four screens onto my iMac. But I'm a babe in the DIY woods compared to Google hardware engineer Ben Krasnow and his amazing DIY scanning electron microscope.

Here's a comprehensive overview of his project:

Plus, if you want to know more about what's involved, check out his materials and sourcing video:

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3 of 7 David Gewirtz/ZDNet

World's largest working model airport

I've traveled many places, but I have yet to get to Hamburg, Germany. Besides being the namesake for one of the planet's most sacred and wonderful foods, Hamburg is the home of Minatur Wunderland, containing the world's largest model railroad and -- in the modeling of Kunffingen Airport, the world's largest model airport.

Pictures don't do this thing justice. You should definitely watch the video:

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4 of 7 David Gewirtz/ZDNet

Kinect-controlled Lego Mindstorms robot

Next, we have a Lego robot controlled by a Kinect. Built by an Italian DIYer who goes by the name Rasomuro, the video starts off slow, but after a few minutes you'll realize that as he moves his hands, so goes the robot. Visit his Web site to learn more.

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5 of 7 David Gewirtz/ZDNet

A working steam engine made entirely out of glass

Amazing geek projects don't have to involve wires and chips. Here's one example that proves my point. Michal Zahradnik is a seventh-generation Czechoslovakian glass-blower located in Prague. His heritage shows.

This amazing machine is a working steam engine, made entirely out of glass. Zahradnik has also made an actual locomotive, also entirely out of glass. Just amazing.

Here's a slightly different model running on rails:

And here's a much better-quality video showing a different, non-loco steam engine in full operation:

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6 of 7 David Gewirtz/ZDNet

Lego space station built inside the real space station

Sometimes it's not the project that's amazing, but the nature of the project that is worthy of a full-on "Wow!" That's the case with this little Lego model of a the International Space Station that just happened to be built on board the International Space Station. I know. Right?

To build the thing (and make sure all the tiny parts didn't go flying all over), Japanese astronaut Satoshi Furukawa built the miniature inside a series of clear plastic bags ... and you can watch, courtesy of YouTube:

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7 of 7 David Gewirtz/ZDNet

Replace all Web images with cat pictures

I recently discovered the site MakeUseOf.com. When I paid the site a visit this morning, I found an article that immediately made me giggle with the diabolical nature of the feat of geekery involved.

These folks went ahead and built themselves an image proxy server using a Raspberry Pi. They set up the server to intercept Web browser requests for images (any images!) and replace them with pictures of kitties. It makes me lean back in my desk chair, bang my feet together, and chortle.

I can't begin to describe this bit of inspired madness. Go ahead and read the full article. Post a comment if you build one of these yourself.

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