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Sony PSP Go Teardown

Bill Detwiler cracks open the 2010 Sony PSP Go hand-held game console in this TR Dojo teardown gallery.
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Sony officially unveiled the PSP Go at E3 in June 2009 and US sales began in October that same year. As we didn't have time to cover it as part of our 2009 Geek Gift series, we decided to buy one for this year's series. Sony originally sold the PSP Go for $249 (US), but has since dropped the price to $199 (US).
Follow along as I crack open the PSP Go.
Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler
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The Sony PSP Go weighs 158g and is 128 mm wide by 69 mm high by 16.5 mm deep. According to Sony, the unit is 43 percent smaller than the original PSP.
The PSP Go has a PSP CPU (System clock frequency 1 - 333MHz) and 16GB of built-in Flash memory. You can expand the memory with a Sony Memory Stick Micro.
The display is 3.8 inch (diagonally) and provides a resolution of 480 x 272 pixels (16:9 aspect ratio).
It has built-in stereo speakers and a microphone. It supports 802.11b WiFi, Bluetooth, USB 2.0, and Sony's Memory Stick Micro M2.
Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
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In the box are the PSP Go unit, the AC power adapter and cord, Media Go CD-ROM, and product documentation.
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The PSP Go has a 5V AC adapter.
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With the display panel closed, we can see the speakers, WLAN indicator, Bluetooth indicator, and PS button on the front of the PSP Go.
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With the display panel open, we can see the directional buttons, analog joystick, microphone, Start button, Select button, and control buttons.
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On the bottom of the PSP Go are the multi-use connector and headset connector.
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On the top of the PSP Go are the L button (left trigger), display button, volume up/down button, sound button, and R button (right trigger).
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Along the left side of the PSP Go are the Memory Stick Micro slot, Memory Stick Micro indicator, wireless switch, and strap holder.
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Along the right side of the PSP Go are the power indicator and the power/hold button.
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The first step in disassembling the PSP Go is to remove the four Phillips #00 screws on the back panel.
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Two more Phillips #00 screws are located along the PSP Go's top edge. You'll also need to remove these.
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With all six external screws removed, you can lift the back panel away from the case.
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With the back panel removed, we get our first look inside the PSP Go. Unfortunately, this is about as far as you can go without voiding your warranty.
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With the warranty sticker removed, we can see the battyer connector.
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The PSP Go has a 3.7V Li-ion battery.
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With the battery and back panel removed, the thin plastic cover the run along the top of the PSP Go should pop off.
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Before removing the logic board, we'll need to remove the two trigger buttons. A single Phillips screw holds each in place.
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Before removing the triggers, you'll also have to disconnect their ribbon cables.
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Two screws hold the plastic cover that runs along the PSP Go's bottom edge in place. You'll need to remove both screws before removing the cover.
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A single screw and thin ribbon cable hold the PSP Go's headphone jack in place.
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To the left of the headphone jack is the screw for the analog joystick.
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With the screw removed, you can disconnect the analog joystick's ribbon cable and separate it from the logic board.
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A single screw remains in the logic board.
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With all the screws removed, you'll also need to disconnect several ribbon cables from the logic board.
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With all the screws removed and the ribbon cables disconnected, you can lift the logic board from the case.
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We'll turn our attention back to the logic board in a bit. But now, let's concentrate on the case and the components that remain inside.
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The direction buttons are part of a single cross-shaped button. It should just fall from the case.
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Four small, black screws remain in the case. These screws hold the sliding display assembly to the black plastic case. You'll need to remove all four screws.
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With the display assembly removed, you can more easily see the four screws holes in the black plastic case.
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At this point, there's not much left attached to the PSP Go's case.
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The display assembly contains the sliding hinge, a base plate, the display, and the exterior plastic frame. There are a total of 10 screws on the back of the display assembly. Six of the screws hold the hinge to the plastic base plate. You don't need to remove these.
The four outer screws hold the display's exterior frame (and thus the display) to the base plate. You'll need to remove these four screws to remove the display.
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With the screws removed, you can gently pry the base plate away from the displays exterior frame.
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A thin ribbon cable connects the display plate to the display. You'll need to disconnect this cable before proceeding.
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With the base plate removed from the display assembly, you can separate the display screen from the exterior frame. You could use a thin metal blade or a plastic PSP case opening tool. But, I found the my fingernail work just as well and didn't scratch the frame or display.
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The speakers and PS button are still mounted to the display's frame.
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We'll need to remove the EMI shields before we can see the main chips on the PSP Go's logic board.
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Unfortunately, the EMI shield bases have cross beams, which obscure some of the chips. As I want to reassemble this PSP Go in working order, I'm going to leave the beams in place.
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Sony Computer Entertainment CXD2986A1GG
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The Samsung 922 flash memory module provides 16GB of storage. The Cirrus Logic 42L52CNZ CFTW0937 MAL is a stereo codec.
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The Sony PSP Go was fairly easy to disassemble. Sony used standard Phillips #00 screws and didn't solder any of the key components in place. Although disassembling the PSP Go will likely void the warranty, it's definitely serviceable with the right tools and a little patience.
If you're thinking about buying a PSP Go for your favorite gadget geek this holiday season, check out our Geek Gift review.
Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

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