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Things you didn't know you could do online

If you're bored of Facebook, why not rent a husband or watch the African plains to pass the time?
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1 of 12 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Hire a husband

To give single ones among us a hand with odd tasks or to keep nagging at bay and stay in marital bliss, Husband to Rent "was set up to offer professional assistance to clients who are busy with their careers and can't find time to do small home repairs."

Giving them a call or using the online contact form lets you purchase help for jobs including fixing furniture, painting, cleaning, setting up satellite TV, furniture arranging and renovation. The U.K.-based 'husbands' can be hired for £40 an hour, £80 for 3 hours, £150 per day -- for eight hours -- or for larger jobs, the price is negotiable. 

Via: Husband to rent

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2 of 12 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

EdX: Take a free course

edX is a massive open online course (MOCC) platform launched in 2012. Beginning with a single free course in electronics, edX has expanded its free offerings to include medical courses, physics, law, ethics and beyond. 

Established by Harvard and MIT, the non-profit allows students to register before undertaking courses through pre-recorded lectures, forums and virtual labs. 

Via: EdX

 

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3 of 12 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Make good use of your 404 page

If you are a website owner with a bland 404 page, why not put it to good social use?

This is the concept behind the NotFound project, which gives website masters an application that automatically publishes a picture of a missing child on every 'not found' page of a website. At the moment, the application mainly shows children missing in Belgium, Cyprus, France, Greece, Italy, Spain and the U.K., although the project will soon launch in the United States and Canada. 

Via: notfound.org

 

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4 of 12 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Check out the plane's interior for your next flight

Sitting for hours in a cramped metal tube isn't generally much fun, unless you have pockets deep enough to hang out in first class. If you'd like a more comprehensive look at the plane you've booked yourself on, then Seatguru can give you airline seat maps, flight updates and photos.

In addition, previous fliers are able to comment on particular craft or flights.

One of the coolest features available on the website is a Beta comparison service between different economy flights. The prices vary -- as does seat width and leg room. 

Via: Seatguru

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5 of 12 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Design and order your 3D-printed creations

3D printing is becoming established as a construction method in everything from art to architecture. Health professionals have used the technology to build innovative prosthetics for children, firms offer 3D models in replace of pregnancy ultrasounds, Japanese companies use it to create miniature dolls of citizens and New York officials are panicking over 3D printed weaponry.

For the average consumer however, there is imateralise -- an online service which lets users upload or sell 3D designs for manufacture. With designs for jewelry to artwork and transport models, the upload and print service is useful if you want to give someone a more unusual gift for their birthday this year.

Via: imaterialise

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6 of 12 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Hunt down and buy leftovers

If you want the comfort of a home-cooked meal and haven't the time or energy to do it yourself, then why not track down neighbors who are willing to sell you their efforts?

Shareyourmeal.net is a food-sharing network. Started in Amsterdam in 2008, the network has expanded and is soon to launch in New York. With over 45,000 cooks and over 73,000 meal purchases, users have taken advantage of a search function that offers location, price and portion options. Once you've found a meal you fancy -- generally between $4.00 to $7.00 in price -- you then arrange with the cook a good time to pick up your dinner. 

Via: Smartplanet | Shareyourmeal

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7 of 12 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

The Internet Archive: How did it all look?

The Internet -- and content therein -- is constantly evolving and changing to improve functionality, incorporate new services, tap new revenue streams including advertisement and revamp designs. But what did websites look like in the past?

If you're interested, archive.org indexes over 240 billion web pages, archives from 1996 to this year. The Wayback system can be accessed by typing in the page where you want to begin, and then select the archive dates you're interested in. 

Via: archive.org

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8 of 12 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Listen to public services radio

Broadcastify, is a website that streams live audio for public safety, aircraft, rail, and marine related communications systems. You can select an audio feed based on U.S. state, zip code or category.

Broadcastify app support is available for Apple iOS, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and other mobile devices. 

Via: Broadcastify

 

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9 of 12 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Pay someone $5 for a random job

For the odd jobs that you need completed, Fiverr lets you pay someone else to do it for you.

The website allows you to sign up and offer a 'gig' for under $5. 48 hours after someone finishes a job, wages are paid to an account which can then be withdrawn through PayPal.

Jobs vary; from choosing a skincare regimen for you to shooting business clips. In other cases, you can have a member of the Maasai pose with your name on a board, you can be taught how to moonwalk, or get someone complete your homework assignments for you.

Via: Fiverr

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10 of 12 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

See what's happening in Africa

There's something relaxing about being on the African plains -- but Africam will allow you to have the experience while sitting at home.

The website, designed in order to bring about more awareness around the illegal wildlife trade, has set up cameras in African areas including Tembe, Nkorho, Idube and the Elephant Plains. Users can connect to these cameras for free, receive animal alerts and take photos 24/7. The Africams can also be used on mobile if you have an iPad or iPhone. 

Via: Africam

 

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11 of 12 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Order snail mail: miniature messages

California-based Leafcutter designs, owned by Lea Redmond and her brother, offers tiny letters set with miniature wax seals for those who want a more unusual spin on typical letter writing.

Once a message is submitted online, the studio makes the letter in-studio and mails it onwards. In order to let the recipient read what's written, each order comes with a magnifying glass as well as a see-through coin case for presentation. 

The service has proven popular, and the product range has now expanded to include one-inch-wide custom letters and 1.75-inch-wide packages aimed at product launches and event invitations. 

Via: Leafcutterdesigns

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12 of 12 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

... watch paint dry.

The Watching Paint Dry Webcam is simply that. Set up in 1998 by Patti A. McEwin, the camera was turned on when her family was painting the dining room.. and that's where it has stayed ever since. 

Via: Pattiann

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