/>
X

Join or Sign In

Register for your free ZDNet membership or if you are already a member, sign in using your preferred method below.

Use your email Use Linkedin Use Facebook

Virtual PC 2007 User Interface

In this image gallery, we take a close look at the user interface behind Microsoft's Virtual PC 2007 and most of its options.

|
zd-defaultauthor-matt-conner.jpg
|
55421.jpg
1 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
When you start Microsoft's Virtual PC 2007, the first thing it takes you to is the Virtual PC Console which is always active (so long as you have virtual machines running). In addition to listing any of the virtual machines that have been created or registered with your copy of VPC, the console has some menus that allow you do manage and configure your virtual machines. Shown here is the FILE menu through which you can launch the wizards for creating or registering new virtual machines or virtual hard disks.
In VPC, virtual machines do not include storage. You have to point virtual machines (VMC files) at virtual hard drives (VHD files). You'll see where this is done later in the screen gallery. In the next set of images, we'll take a look at what's under the OPTIONS menu.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55422.jpg
2 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Under Virtual PC 2007, there are two graceful ways to shut down virtual machines. The first is to shut down the operating system the way you would normally shut-off any PC. The second is to simply shut down Virtual PC 2007. When this RESTORE AT START option is checked (accessible via the console's FILE-OPTIONS menu), any virtual machines that were running at the time that Virtua PC 2007 was shut off will be restored to their most recent state.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55423.jpg
3 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Under the FILE-OPTIONS menu is a PERFORMANCE option that allows the user to balance the performance needs of the any virtual machines against each other as well as with the host system. The various radio button options are pretty self-explanatory
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55453.jpg
4 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
In the HARDWARE ASSISTED VIRTUALIZATION OPTION (accessible via the console's FILE OPTIONS menu), Virtual PC theoretically can tap into any hardware-based virtualization technologies that are available from the host system's microprocessor. For example, certain Intel processors include Intel's "VT" virtualization technology. AMD has a similar technology called "AMD-V."
As our Lenovo Thinkpad X60 includes Intel's VT-enabled 1.83 Ghz Core Duo L2500 mobile (low power; 15w) processor, we were somewhat confounded by the fact that the checkbox on this option was greyed-out when perhaps it shouldn't have been. Our guess is that when this feature is working, the virtual machines should expect to pick up some additional performance benefit through the host processor's hardware assistance. We're checking with Microsoft to see what's up with this option.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface and for an update on whether Microsoft has a response to this problem, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55425.jpg
5 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Under the FILE OPTIONS menu, Virtual PC has a FULL SCREEN option. The help text doesn't do a good job of explaining what this option is for, but we found some useful text on Microsoft's MSDN Web site that describes the option in pretty good detail:
....When this option is checked, putting a virtual machine into fullscreen mode will cause the host operating system to change its monitor resolution to the one being used by the guest operating system. This allows you to see exactly what you would normally see if you were running the guest operating system directly on the hardware. However - if you uncheck this box the host operating system will not change its resolution - and instead it will draw a black border around the virtual machine display when it is in fullscreen mode. This can be useful if you want to run a virtual machine in fullscreen mode - but the resolution it is using is not supported by your monitor (or - in the case of LCD screens - it may just look a little odd)....
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55454.jpg
6 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Imagine if you had 5 systems in a room and they all shared the same speaker system. Every time an event triggered a sound on one of the systems, you might not know exactly which sytem it came from. This option helps you to manage that problem.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55455.jpg
7 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
This option suppreses the display of Virtual PC's error and other informational dialogs.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55457.jpg
8 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
With Virtual PC 2007 (as with VMWare's Workstation), a special combination of keys is sometimes need to let the host operating system know you are trying to access it with the mouse, instead of one of the active virtual machines. With this option, the end-user can change that special combination.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55459.jpg
9 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Sort of the opposite of the option in the previous menu, this is how a VM knows when start capturing mouse and keyboard input: either by clicking on it, or optionally, simply by moving the cursor into the virtual machine's window.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55430.jpg
10 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
When we first tried to access Virtual PC 2007's security options, we were prevented from seeing them as well as making any changes because we were logged-into the host system as a non-administrative user. Shown on the next image are the security options that an administrative user of the host system would see.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55431.jpg
11 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Once we logged into the PC as a user with administrative privileges, we were able to see Virtual PC 2007's various security options. The options basically allow system administrators to further restrict access to some of Virtual PC 2007's commands (access to the options dialog, access to a virtual machine's settings, and the wizards for creating new virtual machines and virtual hard drives.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55432.jpg
12 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Virtual PC 2007 currently supports six languages: English, German, French, Japanese, Italian, and Spanish.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55433.jpg
13 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
From Virtual PC 2007's ACTION menu, users have several choices. They can start the currently highlighted virtual machine. If the virtual machine is running, they can pause it or reset it (in the event it is crashed), they can remove it (or deregister it from the console), or they can access a specific VM's settings and properties (shown in the next series of images).
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55434.jpg
14 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
When a particular VM is highlighted, Virtual PC 2007 can show you all of the settings for that VM (for example, some of the settings that were created when your virtual machines were created. The first of these (shown here) is simply the filename of the virtual machine. Alternatively, you can just use Windows explorer on the host system change a virtual machine's filename. But then, the console might lose track of it. That's OK though. You can easily re-register it with the console.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55435.jpg
15 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
When virtual machines are originally established in Virtual PC 2007 (as seen in the image gallery of our Virtual PC installation sequence), you have to tell Virtual PC how much virtual RAM to allocate to the system. The good news is that when you set the RAM, you can always come back and change it later.
Why or when might you do this? Well, you may find that the VM isn't performing as well as it should and so you might decide to boost its memory. Or, let's say you add more physical memory to your system which means you can make more available to your VMs. Or, let's say you move your VM to another system with more RAM.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55436.jpg
16 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
As can be seen from this dialog, Virtual PC 2007 can support connectivity of a VM to as many as three separate virtual hard drives (shown here, only one is being used). This independence of storage and VM makes for some interesting possibilities. For example, let's say you have two VMs that have different reasons for accessing the same data at different times. Well, if that data is storied in a virtual hard drive (VHD), you can point multiple VMs to it as a though it were those VMs' second hard drive (not simultaneously).
Or, let's say you needed to distribute data in a batch mode.Some master system could update the data stored in a VHD, and then the VHD could be distributed the way any other data file might get distributed (FTP, CD-ROM, in some download directory, etc) and then each user (assuming they're running with Virtual PC) could simply over-write their existing data VHD with the new one. The possibilities are very interesting the minute you move to a virtual machine model.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55437.jpg
17 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Like having multiple virtual hard disk (VHD) access, having the ability to UNDO disk writes adds a lot of flexibility to a virtual machine environment. It enables a variety of scenarios -- for example, testing -- where using a virtual machine might result in changes to the contents of VHD that you want might want to be undone before the next round of testing. This can also be accomplished by simply making copies of your VHDs and renaming those copies to the original VHD name when you want to start with the original one again. But that can be pretty tedious.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55438.jpg
18 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Though not accessible during a virtual machine's creation phase, this setting offers a a potential remedy to those situations where a virtual machine cannot see the host system's CD/DVD drive. We actually had a problem with this when our VM could not see the bootable media in our Thinkpad's CD/DVD drive. Changing the setting did the trick.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55439.jpg
19 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
This is pretty self-explanatory. Not that very many people use floppy disks any more, particularly in a workstation environment. Some people boot their servers are booted from floppy disks.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55440.jpg
20 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
A Virtual PC-based virtual machine can access the host system's COM ports (for example, for modem access). Here, in this dialog, is where COM1 gets mapped to one of the COM: ports on the host system (as you can see, there's another setting for COM2, just below COM1).
On our Thinkpad X60, the modem was connected to COM3. In tests, the virtual machine was able to easily issue commands to the Thinkpad's modem and connect to one of iPass' local poins of presence (for dial-up access to the Internet). One thing we noticed though is that you have to be careful about trying to map a VM's COM port to a physical COM port when that physical COM port is already "mapped" by another VM that's in use.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55441.jpg
21 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Like with the COM ports, this is where you map the virtual machine's parallel port to some physical parallel port on the host system.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55460.jpg
22 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Virtual PC 2007 allows you to select which of the host system's physical networking connections to use, and in what priority order.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55443.jpg
23 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Check Check Check Check. Sound check. Need we say more?
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55444.jpg
24 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
We spotted this problem when we originally created our virtual machine -- ofr some reason, even though we're using a VT-technology enabled Intel L2500-based systems (capable of hardware assisted virtualization), the feature in Virtual PC 2007 to take advantage of it seems greyed out. We're waiting to hear back from Microsoft for possible explanations.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55445.jpg
25 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
This is pretty self-explanatory. With this feature enabled, the host system doesn't have to "capture" the mouse pointer away from the virtual machine (typcially requires a special keystroke combination to let the VM know to let the host system have the mouse).
As can be seen from the text, something called Virtual Machine Additions (VMAs) must be installed in order for this feature to work (right now, accessing the setting is impossible because it is greyed out). It also must be installed to enable file sharing between VMs or between a VM and the host system (see next image). Installing VMAs is easy (from the menus that are a part of a single running virtual machine's window). There's a reason they can't be installed when the virtual machine is created (an obvious question). More on that in a couple of images.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55446.jpg
26 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
If you want the same files to be accessible to multiple VMs or to the host operating system, then you must enable file sharing. The way file sharing works is some folder that's accessible to the host OS is designated as a shared directory. Then, within the VM, that directory can have its own drive letter assigned to it.
For this feature to work, Virtual Machine Additions (VMAs) must be installed. Right now, it isn't so this setting is greyed-out (inaccessible for configuration). In the next set of images, we show what the installation of Virtual Machine Additions looks like (it's accessible from the ACTION menu on the main window of any running virtual machine.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55469.jpg
27 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
From the Action menu on any running Virtual PC 2007 virtual machine, if you click "Install Virtual Machine Additions," this is what you see next. It literally implants a CD-ROM ISO image into the virtual CD/DVD drive and then runs setup off that "virtual CD."
The reason VMAs cannot be installed when the virtual machine is created is because the software that enables the guest operating system (in this case Windows XP) to access the shared drive must be installed on the guest operating system. That's what's happening here. This is a little bit different from how VMWare handles it.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55470.jpg
28 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Virtual Machine Additions installs itself into the guest operating system just like it would into any other Winapp.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55471.jpg
29 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
It didn't take us long at all to install VMAs.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55472.jpg
30 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Once VMA installation is complete, the ability to share a file between guest and host is complete.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55473.jpg
31 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
With VMAs installed, to set up a specific virtual machine Virtual PC 2007 so it can share a directory with the host operating system (the non-virtual PC), we clicked "Share Folder."
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55474.jpg
32 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Then, to share a folder, we navigated the host's directory structure to... (see next image)...
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55475.jpg
33 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
(cont. from previous image)....a directory we created on the host OS called "SharedDataDirectory." Underneath, you can see how we picked Z as the drive letter through which the virtual machine would have access to the folder that is natively available to the host OS.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55476.jpg
34 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
After selecting a directory to share, it appears in the virtual machine's shared folder list. On the list of things we absolutely hate though is when something you pick (a directory for example) is so long, you can't (a) easily see the entire name of the entry or (b) resize the window so that you can see the entire name. At least with Windows applications, this seems to happen quite often. Why this box isn't resizeable, we have no idea. But we strongly suggest to Microsoft that it correct the problem soon (here and elsewhere in the company's applications and OSes where this nasty UI problem occurs).
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55447.jpg
35 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
As you can see, there's a nice range of available options when it comes to displaying the windows that a virtual machines shows up in.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55461.jpg
36 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
This shows the various options that are available through the resolution drop down.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55449.jpg
37 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Virtual PC 2007 can do a range of things when the shut down command is issued from outside the virtual machine (as opposed to from within the operating system). In our case, we liked the option to "Save State" which means tha whatever state the OS was in when a virtual machine was externally powered down will be the same state that it's restored to the next time it is powered back up.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55478.jpg
38 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Here, post configuration, is our Windows XP-based VM listed in Virtual PC 2007's console. The thumbnail gives a pretty accurate idea of what's currently being displayed on the guest OS.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55479.jpg
39 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
By right clicking on a virtual machine that's listed in the Virtual PC 2007 console, you can get access to a PROPERTIES dialog. As can be seen here, even though we're running XP in the VM and also have Virtual Machine Additions installed, the properties (where "n/a" is seen) aren't entirely accurate. We were unable to reliably reproduce the problem.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55482.jpg
40 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
Shows basic Input/Output activity through the network and storage interfaces.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.
55483.jpg
41 of 41 Matt Conner/ZDNet
As best as we can tell, this has to do with the command-line options that are associated with scripted execution of a particular VM. More on the various options can be found here.
For David Berlind's write-up on The Virtual PC 2007 User Interface, see his post in ZDNet's TestBed blog.

Related Galleries

Windows Server vNext Technical Preview: Screenshots
windows-server-vnext-technical-preview-screenshots.jpg

Related Galleries

Windows Server vNext Technical Preview: Screenshots

Run virtual machines on Windows 8.1 with Client Hyper‑V: A quick how-to
run-virtual-machines-on-windows-8-1-with-client-hyperv-a-quick-how-to.png

Related Galleries

Run virtual machines on Windows 8.1 with Client Hyper‑V: A quick how-to

VMware India gears up for bigger global role
vmware-india-gears-up-for-bigger-global-role.jpg

Related Galleries

VMware India gears up for bigger global role

Setting up Windows 8 Consumer Preview with VirtualBox (Gallery)
6347438.jpg

Related Galleries

Setting up Windows 8 Consumer Preview with VirtualBox (Gallery)

Five features you should know about in VMware's vSphere 5.
6282967.png

Related Galleries

Five features you should know about in VMware's vSphere 5.

Australian Navy trains on virtual warship
navy-warship-simulator-defencemedia-200.jpg

Related Galleries

Australian Navy trains on virtual warship

Convert XP into a Windows 7 Virtual Machine with Disk2vhd
466651.png

Related Galleries

Convert XP into a Windows 7 Virtual Machine with Disk2vhd