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Weird wearable technology

Wearable technology goes beyond Google Glass and rumors of an 'iWatch.'
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1 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Ping back clothing

Ping is a social networking garment which connects the wearer to their social media accounts -- including Facebook -- wirelessly. By performing natural gestures, whether lifting the hood, bending or swinging your arms and moving the zip, you are able to 'ping' back your friends when they send you a comment, like or message. 

The wearer can use an app on their smartphone in order to customize messages sent by sensors that track when you move your clothing. Messages can be assigned to particular groups of friends, can change depending on where you are, who you're talking to or what your mood is.  

Via: Electricfoxy

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2 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Intimacy

Does a color-changing dress turn you on?

Daan Roosegaarde, founder of Studio Roosegaarde hopes so. The high-tech dress turns clear when something gets you excited, which may provide your date with some unexpected eye-candy.

The dress is called Intimacy 2.0. Made in white or black, the garment is constructed with leather and opaque smart e-foils, blended with wireless technology and LED lighting. If your heart begins to race, your dress loses more and more color. "Social interactions determine the garmentsʼ level of transparency, creating a sensual play of disclosure," the project's website states.

Via: Studio Roosegaarde

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3 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Wi-Fi detection hats

Brando Workshop has released the "Wi-Fi Detection Cap," clothing which is able to seek out 802.11 b/g/n signals. If you're looking for a Wi-Fi connection in a public place, then two LED lights on the cap will show you network strength and availability -- although of course you will have to take it off to check.

The hat comes in three colors, two designs, and requires CR2032 batteries. The Wi-Fi Detection Cap costs $14 - $18.

Via: Brando

 

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4 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Combating jetlag: The Re-Timer

Re-Timer is a wearable device that can be used to readjust your body's reaction to light and hopefully combat jetlag.

The Australian research company has created its device to be worn like a pair of glasses. By emitting soft green light, it is supposed to mimic natural lighting -- hopefully preventing the groggyness and ache that frequent fliers face.

Professor Leon Lack, Chief Inventor, said "Photoreceptors in our eyes detect sunlight, signal our brain to be awake and alert, and set our rhythms accordingly. These rhythms vary regularly over a 24-hour cycle. However, this process is often impaired by staying indoors, travelling to other time zones, working irregular hours, or a lack of sunlight during winter months." To better adjust to changes in timezones, Lack suggests that wearing the glasses every day for 50 minutes can help you either delay or advance your body clock. 

Via: Re-Timer

 

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5 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Smart pyjamas

Think of bedtime and you may think of a story and glass of milk, but one company aims to pull the ritual of parents tucking their children in to modern times.

The Idaho-based creators have created pyjama sets for boys or girls which have printed polka-dot patterns that respond to smartphones in the same way as QR codes. If a parent scans the dots with their smartphone, stories "unlock" complete with pictures and audio. 

Pyjama sets retail for $25.

Via: Smartpjs

 

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6 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Like-a-hug

In collaboration with Andy Payne and Phil Seaton, MIT student Melissa Kitchow created a social media-connected vest which allows a hug to be granted over Facebook.

The project page says that being connected through our garments allows "us to feel the warmth, encouragement, support, or love that we feel when we receive hugs," -- taking things further from simply 'liking' a status. 

When a user's photo, video or status is 'liked' by a friend, the vest inflates to mimic the feeling of a hug. In addition, if you squeeze and deflate the vest, the original sender can receive a hug in return. 

Via: Melissa Kitchow

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7 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

RISR: Correcting your body language

Our levels of social interaction and eye contact may have changed due to mobile technology, but for those who are shy or have trouble maintaining the correct posture in the business world, a web of sensors may be able to help.

Called RISR, a web of sensors which is connected to a smartphone scans your target -- perhaps your boss or a potential customer -- and vibrates in order to tell the wearer how best to correct their body language in return. 

The idea of 'mirroring' targets is well-known in body language studies. If you 'mirror' your target's posture, the idea is that they will be more open to what you have to say. For example, RISR will remind you to face your target if they are facing you, or shift your shoulders if they do the same. 

Via: TechCrunch | RISR

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8 of 10 Flickr

Tracking your students

Wearable technology isn't always necessary a plus. Some schools, including the John Jay High School have implemented badges that contain RFID tracking chips -- so a school is always able to know where they are.

Some argue that the chips are useful in cutting down the rates of students skipping school, whereas critics believe that such "smart IDs" are an invasion of privacy. 

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9 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

A bra primed to shock your attacker

When the safety of women is a severe issue in countries including India, some citizens turn to tech for solutions.

Manisha Mohan, an aeronautical engineering student at SRM University in Chennai, has developed a prototype bra which is able to "shock" attackers. After being groped, pressure sensors are activated and cause the bra to deliver an electric shock of 3800kv. The prototype is also able to send a text message to police with GPS coordinates.

Describing her motive behind the project (.pdf), the student said that "Lawmakers take ages to come up with just laws and even after that, women are unsafe. Hence, we have initiated the idea of self‐defense which protects women from domestic, social and workplace harassment."

Via: SmartPlanet | Techpedia

 

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10 of 10 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Smart wellies?

With Glastonbury Festival goers in mind, Orange and renewable energy experts GotWind have unveiled a prototype for thermoelectric wellies that can chanrge your smartphone on the go.

The Orange Power Wellies are equipped with "power generating soles" that convert heat from your feet into an electric current. Slot your mobile into its pouch and this energy is used to charge your device -- handy if you're partying in a field without a power source nearby. 


Via: GotWind

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