MoGo Mouse BT

  • Editors' rating
    6.8 Good

Pros

  • Easy to carry if your notebook has a PC Card slot
  • Internal battery automatically charges while mouse is stowed in PC Card slot
  • Feels solid and comfortable in the hand

Cons

  • Response can be jerky at times
  • Expensive

Many notebook users work perfectly well with the navigation system that's built into their computers, but others prefer to use a mouse. However, a mouse is yet another item to carry in your bag, and that there's often an inconvenient wired connection to the computer. The MoGo Mouse BT addresses these issues by communicating with your notebook via Bluetooth and residing (and charging up) in your system's PC Card slot when it's not in use.

Design

When not in use, the MoGo Mouse BT is a thin, flat object that's precisely the right size to fit into a Type II PC Card slot. At 41g, it won’t add much weight to your bag, while its metal and plastic finish is visually appealing.

When you're ready to use the mouse, you flip open its ‘kickstand’ which lies flush to the back of the casing. This elevates it around 20 degrees or so from a flat position on your desk. With the mouse placed so that its raised end is furthest from your fingertips, grooves sit neatly under the ends of index and second fingers; there's a noticeable sound when either groove is depressed to make mouse clicks.

The MoGo Mouse BT is perfectly symmetrical, so left-handers should find it as easy to use as right handers. To this right-handed reviewer it felt comfortable enough to use.

Features & performance

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The MoGo Mouse BT uses an optical sensor with 500dpi resolution and functions within Bluetooth 1.2's range of up to 10 metres. This is a handy feature as it allows you to sit much further from your notebook than you could with a wired mouse: it is, for example, perfectly possible to run presentations on your notebook for a group sitting around a table without having to sit right next to the notebook yourself.

The mouse works with both PCs and Macs; we tested it on our regular notebook, a Fujitsu Siemens model with Bluetooth built in. Connecting to your notebook is straightforward: first you turn the mouse on by flipping down its ‘kickstand’, whereupon the optical sensor gives off a single red flash to let you know the mouse is powered; next you need to press on an area marked ‘Connect’ on the underside of the mouse, which activates Bluetooth ready for connection (we found this to be somewhat unresponsive and resorted to prodding a small recessed button in the area marked ‘Connect’ with a paperclip); once Bluetooth is activated, a blue light flashes on the front of the mouse and you have three minutes in which to connect with a notebook. Subsequent connections can be made automatically by lifting the ‘kickstand’ and pressing one of the mouse buttons.

The mouse can only be paired with one notebook at a time. However, it's easy to break a pairing by pressing the same Connect button used to create one, after which you can go through the pairing process again with another notebook.

During testing cursor movement around the notebook's screen was at times a little more jerky than we're used to with a tethered mouse. For example, while web pages were loading into the browser, cursor movement was jerky, but when they were fully loaded it was smooth.

The MoGo Mouse BT’s ability to recharge while stowed in your notebook’s PC Card slot means that you don’t have to worry about replacing the batteries, as you do with other cordless mice.

Clearly if your notebook lacks either Bluetooth or a PC Card slot then this product is not for you. You can add Bluetooth to a notebook cheaply and easily if a USB port is available for a dongle, although that then becomes another travel bag item. MoGo even has a Bluetooth adapter styled to look in keeping with the mouse. The absence of a PC Card slot is not so easily remedied.

We like the concept of the MoGo Mouse BT, and found it ergonomic enough to use. However, its performance was erratic at times, and during these periods it was frustrating to use. It's also somewhat expensive — we found several wireless mice for over £10 less, while corded notebook mice can be had for less than £20.


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