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Teclast X3 Plus review: A 6GB tablet at a really good price

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  • Editors' rating
    7.6 Very good

Pros

  • 6Gb RAM gives great performance
  • Adjustable keyboard angle
  • Nice sound from the two speakers

Cons

  • Dedicated 12v 2A power adapter
  • Stylus not pressure sensitive
  • Battery life could be better

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The Teclast X3 Plus feels like a solid tablet. It is well built, with a metal back and adjustable kick stand, and it's really responsive using touch or a stylus on Windows 10 home.

The X3 Plus is powered by Intel's new-generation Apollo Lake N3450 processor with 1.1GHz up to 2.2GHz burst frequency.

This processor is what gives the Chuwi Hi13 tablet such outstanding performance. It has a massive 6GB LPDDR3 RAM and 64GB of eMMC ROM, with an option to extend the storage by 128GB using a TF card. It is really unusual to see 6GB of RAM on such a low cost tablet.

Its 11.6-inch display has a 1920x1080 IPS resolution with a Gen 9 HD graphics card running at 700MHz frequency. In comparison, although the same display size, the Teclast Tbook 16 Pro has Gen8 graphics inside. There is a micro HDMI port for you to connect a second screen.

The X3 Plus has two cameras. There is a 2MP front-facing camera and a 5MP rear camera, which takes reasonable images.

Its dimensions are 11.61x7.2x0.39 inches, a form factor very similar to the a Microsoft Surface Pro, although the Surface Pro is slightly taller next than the X3Plus.

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With practically the same dimensions and resolution, it is easy to mistake the two devices. The X3 Plus weighs 0.91kg, and it's sturdy and made out of metal.

The keyboard/type cover is not included with the tablet but is well worth buying. Slightly different to the Surface Pro, due to the form factor differences, there is less real estate on the mouse glide pad on the X3Plus.

In fact, the small glide pad meant I gave up on using it as a mouse track and added an external mouse to the tablet.

The keys give a solid feel and have a nice typing experience. Closing the keyboard will put the tablet to sleep. Unfortunately, there is no backlight for the keyboard, which is a pain when working in dim light.

The X3 Plus has a keyboard with solid keys that make a nice reassuring click. Keyboard response is good, and the keyboard itself can be repositioned using a second magnet to angle the keys.

I think this gives a much better ergonomic writing position. However, there are a couple of features that let this device down.

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(Image: Teclast)

This tablet only has one OS installed, Windows 10 Home, unlike the X98 or the Tbook 16 Pro, which also boot to Android. I missed the Android apps I use when I'm not working.

The volume from the two speakers is good and quite loud. There is just a little distortion. The headphone jack gives clear sound.

One thing that I hated was the power adaptor. I plugged the micro USB into what I thought was the charging socket and left it to charge (who reads the user manual?).

I was dismayed to find that the battery had ran down, and I had to hunt for the bespoke adaptor. Other Teclast tablets charge just fine using micro USB. Why the change? It is really inconvenient and adds more stuff to carry.

Its battery is 8000mAh, the same as the X98. The Tbook 16 Pro has 7,200mAh. When running Windows 10 Home -- and not plugged in -- the battery lasted about 5.5 hours. That's not quite enough for a full day of usage.

The stylus is basic, with no pressure sensitivity, so handwriting will suffer. If you only use the stylus as a pointer, then it will do the job for you. The stylus has a micro USB to charge the internal battery.

All in all, I think that Teclast are really getting things right with their latest iteration of tablets, and apart from the clunky DC adaptor, it seems to have made great advances with the X3 Plus. Now it needs to focus on getting that stylus and mouse glide pad right.

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