13 year-old gets presenters' slot at linux.conf.au

13 year-old gets presenters' slot at linux.conf.au

Summary: Thirteen-year-old Elizabeth Garbee may not know as much about Linux as her father Bdale Garbee, Linux CTO for Hewlett Packard and former Debian Project Leader, but that won't stop her from presenting at linux.conf.

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TOPICS: Open Source, Linux
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Thirteen-year-old Elizabeth Garbee may not know as much about Linux as her father Bdale Garbee, Linux CTO for Hewlett Packard and former Debian Project Leader, but that won't stop her from presenting at linux.conf.au 2005.

Elizabeth, who has had a computer since she turned two, has been running Debian since the time she was nine. According to her bio on the conference speaker's list, her installation of Debian GNU/Linux on a server before she had reached 10 years of age "proves that installing Debian really isn't very hard," although it should be noted that "Dad is around to answer questions" if trouble hits.

Elizabeth will be speaking on "Extending Tuxracer - Learning by Playing", a seminar which Chair of the 2005 organising committee Steven Handley has said will revolve around making modifications to Tuxracer (a popular open source game involving Linux's cuddly mascot) with the aim of making the game more fun. Ex-Debian Project Leader and dad Bdale will also present at the conference.

Whether Elizabeth is representative of a new generation of youthful Linux gurus is hard to determine, but her seminar at this year's linux.conf.au conference, to be held at the Australian National University from 18-23 April, is certainly one example of what Hanley has said is an attempt to make the conference more "interesting, fun and unusual".

Other speakers at the event will include Eben Moglen (General Counsel for the Free Software Foundation), Rasmus Lerdorf (author of PHP), Robert Love (Linux kernel developer), Andrew Morton (Linux 2.6 kernel maintainer) and Andrew Tridgell (primary author of Samba).

As usual, a host of mini-conferences will be held around the main conference, with some of the more notable ones dealing with open source in education and government, the free office suite OpenOffice.org and the recently hot area of embedded applications.

The conference announced today that early-bird (discounted) registrations for the week of open source festivities had closed, with those wanting to register for the approximately 260 tickets left being forced to pay full price. Information was also released to the effect that IBM will take the primary sponsor role for the week. The full programme for the conference will be announced on 18 February.

Topics: Open Source, Linux

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  • "Other speakers at the event will include presentations from Even Moglen (General Counsel for the Free Software Foundation)"

    Incorrectly spelt name - should be "EBEN" not "EVEN".
    anonymous
  • DID YOU KNOW that a 12 year old boy from Erode is a RedHat Certified Engineer ? A Microsoft Certified Professional at 10, the young techie is a RedHat certified Engineer on EL version3. Probably the youngest . A boy who has also made to the Child Genius Quiz conducted by Sidhartha Basu ..
    anonymous
  • Microsoft is like a bugzapper

    Im 14/m/aust and I don't think ive ever met a fellow linux user under 19 in australia. I am doing my best to promote Linux and I have had a few victories. Today I persuaded a hardcore m$ user to try linux, his comment was "It's a dammned sight better than what I thought, Im gonna run it on my desktop at home now".

    The problem with the Linux is that (even though I have seen a computer retailing at Harvey Norman with Linspire) is that it is not thrown out into the sight of the teenage community. Microsoft is, you could say, like a giant bugzapper, its big bright and irresistable. If linux was given the same hype it would fly.

    The reason I think it is a good idea to appeal to the teenage area is because (don't quote me on this) computers are cool now (approx. 6/10 teens have msn messenger) and if they don't atleast hear about Linux they might never end up using it and there goes the future Linux users and developers.

    Eyecandy is the key.
    anonymous