1Gbps NBN a response to Google: Quigley

1Gbps NBN a response to Google: Quigley

Summary: The chief executive of the National Broadband Network Company (NBN Co), Mike Quigley, has admitted that the company's announcement of one-gigabit-per-second services on the NBN was in response to media criticism after Google's one gigabit US network had been announced.

SHARE:
TOPICS: Google, Broadband, NBN
36

The chief executive of the National Broadband Network Company (NBN Co), Mike Quigley, has admitted that the company's announcement of one-gigabit-per-second services on the NBN was in response to media criticism after Google's one gigabit US network had been announced.

"The reason we announced one gigabit was simply because when the government said you've got to provide at least 100Mbps, Google at the time made an announcement that they were providing 1 gigabit in the US. And suddenly we went from a situation facing [those] in the media saying 'what on earth does anyone need 100 megs for?' to saying 'this is already redundant, it is already out of date, you can't do one gig'," he told a Parliamentary inquiry into the benefits of the NBN in Sydney this morning.

"So we went out immediately with a press release that said, 'in fact we can do one gig, we were planning to do one gig, we just hadn't spoken about it yet but here it is, this technology can do one gig. It will come in a later product release'."

Quigley said that the 1Gbps product release will be outed within six or twelve months of the release of the basic packages on the NBN.

Quigley initially made the announcement that NBN Co had planned to offer 1Gbps services in March 2010, shortly after Google had announced its own Fiber For Communities program, delivering broadband services in the US.

Prime Minister Julia Gillard and Communications Minister Stephen Conroy then re-announced the 1Gbps plans in the course of the 2010 Federal Election campaign. Despite the heated debate between Labor and the Coalition at the time over broadband policies, Quigley said that it wasn't an election stunt but rather an appropriate piece of information to release to the industry.

Quigley also told the committee today that the company is in the "final stages" of negotiations with Telstra for its $11 billion deal to lease infrastructure, decommission the existing copper network and move Telstra customers onto the NBN.

NBN Co will not be seeking to overbuild existing fibre networks such as those provided by AARNet, according to Quigley, but he said that in cases where there is just one fibre network offered in an area that wasn't offering wholesale access, then NBN Co may seek to roll-out to that area.

The Parliamentary inquiry will today hear from the likes of Chinese network technology company Huawei, as well as Optus, the Communications Alliance, the Australian Telecommunications User Group and Intel-GE Care Innovations, all discussing the potential benefits of the Federal Government's $37.5 billion broadband project.

Topics: Google, Broadband, NBN

About

Armed with a degree in Computer Science and a Masters in Journalism, Josh keeps a close eye on the telecommunications industry, the National Broadband Network, and all the goings on in government IT.

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Talkback

36 comments
Log in or register to join the discussion
  • Of course it wasn't an election stunt, we all know what fibre is capable of and facts are facts... bring on the fibre. I'm sure I could put that 1gbps connection to good use.
    Hubert Cumberdale
  • As far as the fibre goes it is still not clear what it is capable of because of testing limitations and transmission techniques yet to be invented. Possibly several Tb/s. But the main constraint is limits on peripheral hardware. Maybe, a problem now but in a few years it won't be. Developments in photonic chips will bring computer processing into the tens of Gb/s range and network switches will be capable of atleast 1 Tb/s. This is why fibre is necessary for a piece of infrastructure which is to last 30-40 years. It is future proof. I bet no-one out there can give any credible examples of other technologies the rival fibre. Instead they will say that fibre isn't required now. This is called having a lack of vision.
    omega-b9c3d
  • Can this get anymore stupid.

    1Gbps to the home. These punters who are on a $25.00 Exetel plan for 200GB are going to pay $1000 a month for 1Gbps for 100MB?

    Give us a break please! Supposed 'vision' doesn't make up for stupidity.
    Theguy-bbb4a
    • "Can this get anymore stupid."

      You just posted your ill-informed opinion and non-facts on this subject again so apparently not.
      Hubert Cumberdale
    • Another childish remark from Theguy, shock me! Why do you think it's stupid? Please advise us so we can educate you... And please inform us on where you got your pricing for internet plans? It, umm, doesn't seem correct??? Or were you just being sarcastic again? Grow up peter pan...
      omega-b9c3d
    • Theguy said -"supposed 'vision' doesn't make up for stupidity".

      Sad for those like you then my friend (and I say friend with total insincerity) who share both lack of vision and stupidity!
      Rizz-cd230
  • How could it have been anything other then a stunt. Quigley knew if the labour party didn't win office he was out of a job.

    Hubert Cumberdale is a great example of the "I want" party. he stated "I'm sure I could put that 1gbps connection to good use." really? Doing what? Hosting 100 servers in your house? Running a research lab in your basement? Or working on the Teleportation of physical items? All of these things need massive finical backing and no one would put any money into a end of line connection! I'm sorry 100Mbps is stupid enough.

    I love how all the "I want" party say competition didn't work. Show an example. I'll give you the truth.

    We started with wholesale of the Telstra network during privatisation. This lead to increases in customer service. After a while ISP started to move into the space as modems gave way to ADSL. This was all via a wholesale arrangement (Telstra equipment) This lead to competition in Broadband pricing. Around 6 years ago (couldn't be bothered getting the stats) ADSL2 was installed by companies other then Telstra. Telstra was dragged into installing ADSL2 (with some exchanges STILL not getting the love) This is totally forgetting the TransACT projects in the ACT which is going direct to the home or the agile projects in rural area of SA and they now will be over built by the NBN. The market has only stopped because investments would be stranded before there was any ROI. There is too much risk so now everyone will have to sit around and wait for the colossal white elephant before investment will again be put into this sector
    schneider82
    • "Hubert Cumberdale is a great example of the "I want" party."

      Incorrect. I am a member of what is needed for everyone party and I don’t put my needs above anyone else’s unlike the anti-NBN brigade. I believe that if I can get a 1gbps connection (or 100mbps) then so should everyone else.


      "really? Doing what? Hosting 100 servers in your house?"

      Is that really the limit of your thinking? 100 servers in a house?

      "Running a research lab in your basement?"

      Not me but if someone wants to and a fibre connection aids them who are you to argue.


      "Or working on the Teleportation of physical items?"

      Oh I see now, you are one of those Star trekkies with their heads in the sky waiting for that magical wireless sub-space communicators from the show is that why you bring up something so ridiculous?


      "All of these things need massive finical backing and no one would put any money into a end of line connection!"

      Apparently the no one you speak of is the Australian government.


      "I'm sorry 100Mbps is stupid enough."

      HAHAHAHUAUHUHAUHAUHUHAUHAUHUHA. Congratulations you can no longer be taken seriously in this debate.
      Hubert Cumberdale
      • HC... did anyone ever take s82 seriously?

        I laugh when people (not necessarily s82) talk of current network based competition (especially when they claim it will be lost when the big band NBN monopoly muscles in).

        This competition they now laud, comprises almost entirely... ISP's installing DSLAMs into "Telstra's exchanges" and using Telstra's network". That is, if the ISP's actually want to get into Telstra's exchanges (rather than simply resell, re-badged Telstra) or if the ISP does want access, if they can actually get into Telstra's exchanges (remember Telstra were fined $18m for not allowing access)...

        LOL...! This is your wonderful current comms competition... Rather, this is the comms nightmare "pretend competition, which primarily everyone but Telstra shake holders" have been complaining about for years...!

        But now they have their wish?

        Sadly, politics has reared it's ugly head and instead of Telstra vs. everyone, it now Labor's NBN vs. the oppositions kill the NBN (at all costs). And yes, that terrible pretend competition they all whinged about, is now great...OMG!

        Even sadder, the anti-NBNers aren't interested in the NBN's benefits for Australia. They aren't interested in the benefits for their friends/themselves and they aren't even interested on behalf of "their own (future) families".

        Why? Because their ridiculous, blind political subserviency, dictates so...sigh!
        Rizz-cd230
        • "HC... did anyone ever take s82 seriously?"

          Probably not but you know me, I like to throw a bone to these hapless ones sometimes :-) I usually zone out when they use The Australian all time favorite white elephants line unfortunately scheisse28 used it at the very end so I had to read it all.


          "Even sadder, the anti-NBNers aren't interested in the NBN's benefits for Australia."

          That’s exactly right to them this is nothing but politics that’s why the argument always falls back to $$$ with them. I didn’t vote labour or liberal but I can see past the politics and know that ultimately the NBN will benefit Australia.

          Also you have to wonder about these types that oppose it so vehemently. There seems to be more opposition to it now after the election yet the FTTH plan was announced way back in 2009.
          Hubert Cumberdale
        • "This competition they now laud, comprises almost entirely... ISP's installing DSLAMs into "Telstra's exchanges" and using Telstra's network""

          Well there was more competition in the Dial up arena.

          The problem with NBN is no one is allowed to set up their own network bar the government.

          Now the NBN is starting to retail to major companies, soon that'll change over to retail to homes, NBN won't be wholesale only there's not enough money in it for the government, remember they have to get back over 40 billion dollars within 2-3 years, that's unheard of for these types of networks.

          So how does the government make that money while keeping "competition" around? by forcing them to do everything through them, soon they won't be able to provide equipment they'll just be a letterhead.
          zag-cb115
          • Dear oh dear the ignorance is staggering!
            Rizz-cd230
    • Ok, here's an example. I live 30 minutes from the Melbourne CBD. Telstra are the only provider of fixed line internet and I am stuck with 1.5 Mb/s download speeds and in reality it doesn't even come close to this. I don't believe Telstra or any other company had any plans to improve this prior to the NBN. I could be wrong. And I'm sure I'm not the only one in this position. Interesting that you would label people worse off than yourself the "I want" people... Should we label you the "You don't need" guy. In any case, you're wrong.
      omega-b9c3d
    • I am on the TransACT network, and it works as a monopoly. Ripping everyone off. TransACT is basically Telstra here but has made it near impossible for anyone to compete considering the government doesn't regulate them as much as Telstra.

      I can't wait for the NBN. I am really interested in investing in medical practices over the internet to improve the health of those in rural communities so they don't have to travel hours just to chat to a doctor.
      patriotaus
    • Coming in late, but another example. I live within 600m of the local exchange. Between my front door, and the exchanges front door, there is ONE corner. For ADSL2 (or any sort of broadband for that matter), I am well within the sweet spot to get the maximum speed the network is capable of.

      Yet I am happy to get a 6 Mps speed.

      Competition failed me. It failed the area. Other friends cant get ADSL at all, and are forced to rely on wireless. Its not an option, to have any connection whatsoever they pay more than me for 1/10th my download limit. Competition failed them as well. Simply because of cherry picking. I am within visual sight of a primary exchange, and even being so close STILL cant get 1/4 of the advertised speed.

      If thats your idea of competition working, then good luck to you. I expect you're also one of the people that thought dial-up was good enough for everyone as well.

      Here's a tip. Build the capacity, and uses will be created well beyond what we do with the system today. When we had dialup as the primary option, websites were noted for their simplicity and small footprint. Emails were pretty much text only, and downloads were very much a luxury. Do you think being that limited is a GOOD thing?

      Plenty of people did at the time. "Why do people need a 1.5 Mps speed, when all they can use it for is surfing and email?" was pretty common from the neandertechs.

      Bring on the NBN. In 10 years, people will look back at the current speeds and wonder how we got along, much like we do with dialup now.
      Gav70
  • I think we are all getting ahead of ourselves, lets get an NBN with 12mbs first.
    Knowledge Expert
  • I would love to see how NBN will provision a 1000/400 service to a premise when they are using a 2400/1200 service split amongst 32 users. Google is doing direct fiber to deliver those speeds (so its uncontested) and NTT likewise gives you a direct fiber connection if you want such speeds (as do other countries). Places like South Korea are installed WPON (wave dimension multiplexing)

    Looks like that NBNCo did a knee jerk announcement without thinking about it.
    deteego
    • 1000/400 NBN

      "I would love to see how NBN will provision a 1000/400 service to a premise when they are using a 2400/1200 service split amongst 32 users."

      I guess they would up the 2,4Gbs to the 10Gbs that the network and equipment was designed for eh?
      http://www.nbnco.com.au/assets/documents/a-c/analysys-mason-final-design-report-02-mar-2012.pdf

      "Looks like that NBNCo did a knee jerk announcement without thinking about it."
      Looks like they actually planned for this from the beginning and know the capabilities of their network better than you do.
      Goresh
  • So you support fibre by Google and in South Korea, you just don't like fibre (I mean the Labor party) here...hmmm????
    Rizz-cd230
  • It really doesn't matter if NBN Co provide 1000/400 unless the RSP matches that speed with back haul!
    Knowledge Expert