Amazon launches Kindle Touch, Kindle Fire, Silk browser

Amazon launches Kindle Touch, Kindle Fire, Silk browser

Summary: Amazon has unveiled four new Kindle e-readers and a new browser, Silk, that runs partially in the cloud.The four Kindles include a Wi-Fi only, smaller and lighter keyboardless version of the current Kindle, costing $79 in the US and £89 in the UK.

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TOPICS: Emerging Tech
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Amazon has unveiled four new Kindle e-readers and a new browser, Silk, that runs partially in the cloud.

The four Kindles include a Wi-Fi only, smaller and lighter keyboardless version of the current Kindle, costing $79 in the US and £89 in the UK. It is available immediately in both countries.

The $99 Wi-Fi-only Kindle Touch and the $149 3G Kindle Touch 3G replace all the controls of previous devices with an infrared touchscreen. These will be available from November 21 in the US. UK availability and pricing have not been announced.

All three use a 6 inch monochrome e-ink display similar to the previous Kindles, which remain available as the Kindle Keyboard and the Kindle Keyboard 3G.

Jeff Bezos Amazon Kindle Fire

The fourth new e-reader is the $199 Kindle Fire, an Android-powered dual-core tablet with a colour LCD 7-inch screen, a custom Amazon user interface and audio, video and book content management. With free Amazon cloud storage for content, the Fire is Wi-Fi only and uses Amazon's Silk web browser. Also only available in the US for now, it will ship from November 15.

Silk is a split-processing browser, with the tablet and Amazon's EC2 cloud sharing the tasks of loading, displaying and acting on web pages. "All of the browser subsystems are present on your Kindle Fire as well as on the AWS cloud computing platform. Each time you load a web page, Silk makes a dynamic decision about which of these subsystems will run locally and which will execute remotely", Amazon said in a blog post detailing the new technology.

Topic: Emerging Tech

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5 comments
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  • the u s site today 28/9.2011; does seem to say that these are available now and gives
    both us$ price and uk£
    mmaazzaa
  • According to the current rate of exchange, $79 is actually £50.
    In effect Amazon have almost doubled the price for UK buyers.
    It's sickening that companies are still profiteering from us Brits, we've done nothing to deserve being treated like mugs yet they continue to do so.
    Vote with your wallets people, don't buy a kindle!
    seanpray@...
  • @SeanTheMac I'm no fan of Amazon, but the price disparity isn't quite that bad: the $79 Kindle is ad-supported, whereas the UK version isn't. The ad-free version costs $109 in the US, or about £70. That's still not £89, but I don't know if the US price includes tax; if not, £70+VAT = £84. Allow for exchange rate fluctuations, and £89 might well be pretty fair.

    That said, thanks to the DRM I still won't be buying one.
    QuantumCaffeine
  • @QuantumCaffeine

    You are right and @SeanTheMac is wrong. The US price ($109) doesn't include any sales tax (a sore point re Amazon) and the UK price includes 20 percent VAT.

    The UK market is obviously a lot smaller than the US market, and the cost of doing business is higher in the UK, so you wouldn't expect prices to be direct translations. Also, exchange rates vary, so a "direct translation" price would have to change frequently, and UK consumers wouldn't like that either....
    Jack Schofield
  • @QuantumCaffeine
    >That said, thanks to the DRM I still won't be buying one.

    I strip off the DRM before backing up my Amazon-purchased ebooks. This may or my not be legal, depending on where you live. As far as I'm concerned though, they're *my* ebooks so I'm within my rights as long as I'm not posting them on Bittorrent (which I'm not).
    BrownieBoy-4ea41