Accused pirates, indie studios headed for court

Attorneys representing some of the people accused of illegal file sharing by independent film studios said that several have refused to settle with the indie studios.

Attorneys representing some of the people accused of illegal file sharing by independent film studios told CNET yesterday that several have refused to settle with the indie studios. By taking this stance, the accused film pirates are challenging the filmmakers to take them to court.

So, that is what the studios will do, according to their attorney, Thomas Dunlap. Dunlap is one of the founders of Dunlap, Grubb & Weaver, a Washington, D.C. law firm that has made news this year by overseeing the litigation campaign on behalf of the indie studios, a group that includes the makers of the Oscar-winning film "The Hurt Locker."

Dunlap said that his firm knew of several people in different parts of the country who were refusing to settle but declined to identify them. The way Dunlap goes after alleged file sharers is by first filing complaints against unnamed "Doe defendants." He subpoenas the Internet service providers of each person to obtain their name. Dunlap then withdraws the suits against the Doe defendants and refiles the claims against those who decline to settle--only this time he names them.

For more on this story, read Accused pirates to indie filmmakers: Sue us on CNET News.

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