ACS dismisses ADSL as temporary broadband measure

The Australian Computer Society (ACS) has released its broadband policy paper, encouraging whoever wins government to develop a strategy that will deliver "true broadband services" to Australians.The ACS stated that the political parties have compromised strategy for broadband in Australia by diverting the attention towards ADSL, which the ACS believes is nothing more than an "interim solution".

The Australian Computer Society (ACS) has released its broadband policy paper, encouraging whoever wins government to develop a strategy that will deliver "true broadband services" to Australians.

The ACS stated that the political parties have compromised strategy for broadband in Australia by diverting the attention towards ADSL, which the ACS believes is nothing more than an "interim solution".

ADSL runs at 256 to 1024Kbps; the ACS defines true broadband as greater than 10Mbps, the ACS said in a statement.

The ACS broadband policy recommends that the federal government prioritise the implementation of "an integrated forward-thinking strategy that will provide competitive and affordable broadband services to all Australians".

The ACS said the government should focus on rural and remote areas and that the significant changes in the technology should occur during the next 10 to 15 years.

The ACS is also calling for the government to adopt initiatives to increase competition in the telecommunications infrastructure market by encouraging the roll out of broadband alternatives such as wireless services.

"We know from US experience that one of the only ways to get competition in broadband, to traditional telecoms company is through media companies."

The ACS states that the government adopt a strategy that will see the roll out of "true broadband infrastructure" (10Mb/s plus) to as many households as possible in Australia not later than 2015.

"Broadband must be available to all Australians, by the end of the next political term (2007) at rates commensurate with what is available in metropolitan areas, regardless of location and without download quotas. We are calling for all stakeholders to work together to evaluate a maximum dollar cost of broadband, which some industry commentators are claiming is approximately AU$50 per month."

ACS national president, Edward Mandla lauded the Labor party for its "fresh" initiatives to try to stimulate telecommunications within Australia.

"We have been doing and saying the same things over and over for years and expect different results. We therefore commend the Labor party for coming out with fresh thinking and specific initiatives to try to stimulate telecommunications within Australia."

"Investors will only participate in the telecommunications market if there is active competition, which is clearly recognised in the Labor party policy. If we had active competition, businesses such as Comindico -- one of Australia's few junior telecommunications companies -- may not have been put into receivership," Mandla said.

He added that ADSL is "not a medium to long-term solution" and that to pursue such a strategy that won't be relevant in 10 years time is just "money down the drain".

"We are calling for accountability. Australia can't hide behind growing broadband numbers when we slid down from 19 to 23 in the Organisations for Economic Cooperation and Development rankings of broadband penetration," Mandla said.

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All