Always-on VoIP, networks, server closets: so where will we find the power to run them?

 When MySpace got knocked off line a little over a week ago due to heat-related power shortages, it pointed out what few in the Internet community have focused on.Not only is technology power.

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When MySpace got knocked off line a little over a week ago due to heat-related power shortages, it pointed out what few in the Internet community have focused on.

Not only is technology power. Technology uses power, and lots of it.

VOIP-enabled broadband homes and offices where the PCs need to stay on 24/7. Power-hungry video server closets, like the one you are looking at. Networks of offices throughout the land, with banks of IP telephony-enabled networked PCs that need to be regulated to strict temperature standards.

Not only that. Giant server farms. More transmission towers, each of which needs juice. 

Lots of air conditioning, in a nation that along with much of the rest of the world, is getting hotter.

Yet are the technologists of convergence paying attention? Apparently not as much as they ought to.

"Maybe it's time for folks in Silicon Valley to focus a little less on Web 2.0, and a little more on the alternative and renewable energy sector," writes Canadian tech blogger and journalist Mark Evans.

Mark suggests that techs regularly check out Tyler Hamilton's Clean Break blog.

I just did. Updated daily, Clean Break is dedicated to clean tech innovations and implementations. Mad props to you Tyler, for helping to point the way. 

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