Another SSD jumps on the scene

Summary:U.S.-based DRAM manufacturer Super Talent Technology has announced a range of Solid State Disks (SSDs) that utilize the industry standard Serial ATA (SATA) interface. Clearly there's a movement afoot toward SSDs for notebook/tablet/portable applications and the parade of new flash-based media offerings is sure to keep the ultra-light, diskless MacBook rumors burning brightly for the foreseeable future.

Super Talent SSDs
U.S.-based DRAM manufacturer Super Talent Technology has announced a range of Solid State Disks (SSDs) that utilize the industry standard Serial ATA (SATA) interface. According to DigiTimes the SATA SSDs are available in 1.8-inch, 2.5-inch, and 3.5-inch form factors and are 100% compatible with conventional hard disk drives.

Since they contain no moving parts, SSD drives have the advantage of being far more rugged and reliable than regular hard drives while using 85% less power, claimed the company. Moreover, because SSD drives are built using flash technology, they offer sequential transfer speed comparable to magnetic drives and dramatically faster access speeds.

Super Talent's 1.8-inch SSDs will come in up to 32GB capacities; 2.5-inch in up to 64GB; and 3.5-inch in up to 128GB. As memory continues to get denser its only a matter of time before larger capacities come along with the potential to displace spinning magnetic discs in notebooks.

In January I wrote about the SanDisk 32GB Ultra ATA 1.8-inch SSD, then on Monday Intel announced a line of SSDs that feature a USB interface.

Clearly there's a movement afoot toward SSDs for notebook/tablet/portable applications and the parade of new flash-based media offerings is sure to keep the ultra-light, diskless MacBook (nee NanoBook) rumors burning brightly for the foreseeable future.

Are SSDs the future of portable storage, or will magnetic discs continue their reign? 

Topics: Storage

About

Jason D. O'Grady developed an affinity for Apple computers after using the original Lisa, and this affinity turned into a bona-fide obsession when he got the original 128 KB Macintosh in 1984. He started writing one of the first Web sites about Apple (O'Grady's PowerPage) in 1995 and is considered to be one of the fathers of blogging.... Full Bio

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