Apple updates Safari to 3.1; adds support for HTML 5 (updated 2x)

 Apple updated the Safari Web browser today to version 3.1 making it the first browser to support the new video and audio tags in HTML 5 and the first to support CSS Animations.

 

Apple updates Safari to 3.1
Apple updated the Safari Web browser today to version 3.1 making it the first browser to support the new video and audio tags in HTML 5 and the first to support CSS Animations. According to Apple Safari now supports "CSS Web Fonts, giving designers limitless choices of fonts to create stunning new web sites."

Safari 3.1 is a 39MB update that's available from Apple's product page. It requires a restart and shows a build number of 5525.13 in the About box.

I haven't had a chance to test it with all my sites yet, but let's hope that Safari 3.1 alleviates some browser gymnastics that I blogged about on Sunday.

Apple updates Safari to 3.1

Update: Results of Safari's Acid 3 tests after the jump...

Safari 3.1 scores a 75/100 on the Acid 3 test:

The Acid 3 test is far more complex than the Acid 2 test. It covers a wider range of standards and consists of many more individual tests. Browsers have to render a sequence of boxes that display dynamically in a stairstep pattern. For every cluster of tests passed successfully, the boxes will fill in with a color, which signifies that all of the tests covered by that block have passed.

Acid 3: Safari 3.1 scores 75/100

The reference test (100/100) should look like this:

Acid 3: Reference test

WebKit r31114 (18 March 2008) scored slightly better with a 92/100:

Acid 3: Webkit nightly r31114 (18 March 2008) scores 92/100

Dave Hyatt (from the Webkit team) notes:

If you run Acid 3 on the shipping versions of current browsers (Firefox 2, Safari 3, Opera 9, IE7), you’ll see that they all score quite low. For example Safari 3 scores a 39/100. This percentage score is a bit misleading however. The situation with all four browser engines really isn’t that bad.

You can think of the Acid 3 test as consisting of 100 individual test suites. In order for a browser engine to claim one of these precious 100 points, it has to pass a whole battery of tests around a specific standard. In other words it’s like the browser is being asked to take 100 separate exams and score an A+ on each test in order to get any credit at all.

The reality is that all of the browsers are doing much better than their scores would have you believe, since the engines are often passing a majority of the subtests and experiencing minor failures that cost them the point for that section.

Test your browser here and post the results (with platform and discrete version numbers) in the TalkBack below.

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