Apple Watch: Official battery life data

Some of the biggest question marks to hang over the Apple Watch have been related to battery life. Here's everything we know related to the Apple Watch battery.

Some of the biggest question marks to hang over the Apple Watch have been related to battery life. Ever since Apple made it known that the device would need a daily recharge, people have been worried that the Apple Watch wouldn't be able to keep up with their day.

In an attempt to answer some of the questions and alleviate concerns related to the battery, Apple has published some data. The data was collected using "preproduction Apple Watch and software paired with an iPhone using preproduction software."

According to Apple testing, the Apple Watch has "all-day" battery life. In Apple's universe, "all-day" in this case means 18 hours (the folks in marketing are assuming that you sleep 6 hours a day). During those 18 hours an Apple Watch wearer can carry out:

  • 90 time checks (each 4 seconds long)
  • Receive 90 notifications
  • 45 minute of app use
  • A 30-minute workout with music playback from Apple Watch via Bluetooth and heartrate monitoring

This, according to Apple, is a typical day.

As for charge times, Apple claims the Apple Watch can be charged from 0 to 80 percent in 1.5 hours, or 0 to 100 percent in 2.5 hours.

2015-03-1008-44-38.jpg
Apple

Apple has also published battery data for individual tasks:

  • Audio playback: 6.5 hours paired with an iPhone using preproduction software with music playback from Apple Watch via Bluetooth.
  • Watch test: Up to 48 hours, based on 5 time checks (4 seconds each) per hour.
  • Talk time: Up to 3 hours paired to an iPhone.
  • Workout test: Up to 7 hours with a workout session active and the heart rate sensor on.
  • Power reserve: If the battery gets too low, the Apple Watch automatically switches into Power Reserve mode and will continue to display the time for up to 72 hours.

So it seems that the best case scenario is that you can get about five days out of the Apple Watch before the battery is dead (two days of using it as a watch, and a further three days of using it as a watch while it is in reserve power mode). Worst-case, you blow the battery in three hours making voice calls and then the Apple Watch transforms into just a watch.

Apple Watch battery performance data is based on test results using the 38mm Apple Watch. Apple claims that the 42mm Apple Watch "typically experiences longer battery life" but offers no data as to how much longer it can go for. I'm going to assume that since Apple hasn't disclosed the difference that the battery life differences between the two sizes isn't that significant.

So, it all hinges on one question: Do you work harder and longer than the battery in the Apple Watch?

See also:

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All