Bringing out the big guns for SOA

Summary:ComputerWorld reports that the US Department of Defense is moving to Web services and SOA in a big way, as only the DoD can do. According the article, DoD is spending $2 million on Web services registry technology to help developers with the Army, Navy and Air Force locate specific Web services and make "several hundred" Web services available to end users.

ComputerWorld reports that the US Department of Defense is moving to Web services and SOA in a big way, as only the DoD can do. According the article, DoD is spending $2 million on Web services registry technology to help developers with the Army, Navy and Air Force locate specific Web services and make "several hundred" Web services available to end users. It is predicted that each agency may have anywhere between 150 and 200 Web services up and running by the end of the year. A typical Web service published by the Army, for example, may be a service  to check weapons inventory. Registry technology is being provided by Systinet Corp.

Okay, okay, $2 mill is only a spit in the ocean for DoD, but in the Web services and SOA space, this is a pretty big deal. The average "civilian" company now only has up to five functioning Web services, at the most. Then again the DoD has always taken the lead with some of our most innovative big technologies.  Remember the ARPANet?

Topics: Cloud

About

Joe McKendrick is an author and independent analyst who tracks the impact of information technology on management and markets. Joe is co-author, along with 16 leading industry leaders and thinkers, of the SOA Manifesto, which outlines the values and guiding principles of service orientation. He speaks frequently on cloud, SOA, data, and... Full Bio

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