eBay AU calls for online scalpers to make tsunami donation

Under fire over its lack of action against scalpers using its Web marketplace to resell tickets to a sold-out tsunami aid concert, eBay Australia has called for all monies raised above the tickets' face value to date to be donated to the relief effort.

Under fire over its lack of action against scalpers using its Web marketplace to resell tickets to a sold-out tsunami aid concert, eBay Australia has called for all monies raised above the tickets' face value to date to be donated to the relief effort.

eBay Australia and New Zealand trust and safety director, Alastair MacGibbon said in a prepared statement "at eBay we believe that people are basically good -- as such we hope that anyone that has already sold WaveAID tickets on eBay will donate any money raised above the face value of the ticket to the tsunami relief effort."

Complaints were raised after scalpers started selling the tickets on eBay -- which sold out within four hours -- for well over the original cost of AU$61.40. Organisers of the concert -- which features some of Australia's highest profile acts, including Midnight Oil and Nick Cave -- have threatened to ban people who bought their tickets at high prices from eBay sellers.

eBay said it had an "Event Ticket policy" which requires that ticket sellers are responsible for ensuring that their particular transaction does not violate any applicable law or the terms of the ticket itself.

"We have been advised by Ticketek that profiting from the resale of WaveAID tickets is against the terms on the ticket and items need to be listed at face value at Buy It Now --where eBay members can buy a ticket at the listed price immediately."

eBay also advised customers that "prior to buying or selling these types of items, members should contact the ticket issuer and ensure the resale is permitted".

Ticketing agency Ticketek and eBay have been working together to contact sellers to make sure the tickets are listed at face value.

"eBay Australia has a great relationship with the team at Ticketek and have been in contact with them over the past weeks to ensure we are working closely. Ticketek is currently in communication with sellers to ensure tickets are listed at face value using eBay's Buy It Now option."

eBay did not, however, release details on the consequences for eBay sellers who are violating the WaveAID ticket policy.

WaveAID tickets on eBay have now gone up to AU$300. However, some sellers have now placed messages on the Web site claiming they will donate at least some of the money they raise to charity.

One seller added: "Due to popular demand, a donation will be made to Oxfam at the end of this auction, proportionate to the final amount the tickets sell for."

The tsunami has, like many disasters, brought out the worst in some people. Various online scams have emerged several days after the Boxing Day tragedy. In Queensland, residents have been warned of a bogus online charity appeal sent through e-mails. The hoax e-mail claims to be from a reputable charity and includes logos from legitimate charity groups to con people.

Nigerian scam-like e-mails have also spread in Australia, containing pleas for financial help. Recipients of the e-mails are asked to send their money to a bank account in Netherlands or the UK.

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All