Facebook set to upgrade all apps to Graph API by April 30

​Facebook is giving developers until April 30 to update their apps to use the new login and Graph API the company introduced in April last year, before apps are updated automatically.

Facebook app developers have until April 30 to switch their apps to the social network's second version of its Graph API before being automatically switched.

Facebook product manager Simon Cross said in a blog post on Tuesday that the company would begin upgrading all apps to Graph API version 2.0 on April 30.

The company first announced the new version of the Graph API, along with its new login with lightweight review process, at its F8 summit in April 2014.

Facebook claimed that the new version of the Graph API would help developers build, grow, and monetise their apps, while the new Facebook login would give people more control over the information they share with apps.

While the new API and Facebook login were available to developers from that date, the company said at the time that it would migrate all apps to version 2.0 of its Graph API automatically by April this year. Already, many developers are migrating their apps, according to Facebook.

Starting April 30, Facebook will begin upgrading all apps to the new login and second version of Graph API, and remove any permissions that, by that date, have not been approved via its login review. The migration will roll out to all apps over the course of a few weeks.

facebook-image.jpg
(Image: Facebook)

The company said it would also begin to default all unversioned calls to v2.0, telling developers that if their app makes a call to the Graph API without the version specified, it will behave as a v2.0 call to the same endpoint.

If an app has not yet been migrated, developers can opt in to the migration at any time by updating their app's code to use Graph API v2.0.

"We strongly recommend upgrading by these methods, rather than waiting for the automatic upgrade, as this gives you more control over when people start seeing changes in your app," said Cross in the post.

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