Facing drought, San Diego cuts water consumption by 11 percent

In an example of urban water conservation, the city of San Diego has cut its consumption by 11 percent.

In an example of urban water conservation, the city of San Diego has cut its consumption by 11 percent.

Mayor Jerry Sanders said Friday (.pdf) that city residents managed to exceed the city's goal to reduce water consumption by 8 percent in fiscal year 2010.

Last year, the city rolled out mandatory water conservation rules after a "level 2" drought emergency pressured officials to take action.

"A year ago, I urged all San Diegans to make water conservation a conscious part of their everyday lives," Sanders said in prepared remarks. "They've clearly listened."

That's good news for the San Diego County Water Authority, which had to cope with water-pumping restrictions (Southern California imports water from the north) intended to protect fish and other species in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region.

The results:

  • Residential water consumption dropped 10.7 percent.
  • Commercial/industrial water consumption dropped 7.5 percent.
  • Irrigation water consumption dropped 20.4 percent.
  • City government water consumption dropped 10.9 percent.

The challenge isn't over, though. Despite a 5 percent increase in city-wide water consumption year over year, San Diego will receive the same water allocation this fiscal year as last, virtually ensuring that the mandatory water-use restrictions are here to stay.

"Now is not the time to take our eyes off the ball," Sanders said. "Whether it's taking shorter showers or shutting off the water while shaving or brushing your teeth, everyone must continue to make water conservation part of daily life."

Photo: San Diego skyline. (Stacy Spensley/Little Blue Hen/Flickr)

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All