Apple supplier Foxconn may build plant in Wisconsin: Report

The Taiwanese electronics giant had previously said it's looking to expand in the US. Now, its destination may be Wisconsin.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook touring a Taiwan-based Foxconn plant. (File photo)

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Foxconn may choose Wisconsin for its proposed factory in the US, which would be a first for the Taiwan-based iPhone and electronics manufacturer.

According to the Associated Press, Wisconsin officials and Foxconn are in discussions about the plant, but no further details were provided. Michigan is also being considered because of the state's proximity to the auto industry.

President Donald Trump on Tuesday hinted at deal talks, saying Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker may get "a very happy surprise very soon."

Wisconsin officials have declined to comment.

It's not clear if the focus of Foxconn's US plant would be for iPhone displays or another electronics company. Apple makes up for more than half of Foxconn's annual revenue.

Foxconn in late January said that if its customers like Apple cooperate, it could make investments in the US worth more than $7 billion.

Foxconn's billionaire chairman, Terry Gou, previously alluded to a US plant in January after talks with then President-elect Donald Trump. Gou told reporters the possible plant could cost $7 billion and create 30,000 to 50,000 jobs.

At the time, Foxconn said it was "conducting an evaluation of the conditions and potential locations for establishing manufacturing facilities in the US."

"While it is not currently possible to confirm the location for that potential investment or estimate the number of jobs that might be created, it is expected that it would create many direct and indirect job opportunities with the new operation and throughout the supply chain in the US," the company said in a January statement.

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