FSF's "Defective by Design" asks supports to mob Apple Genius Bars

Over the weekend the Free Software Foundation called on visitors to the Defective by Design website to book slots at Apple Genius Bars across the US, Australia, Canada, Italy and the UK to pose questions to Genius Bar staff about ways that the iPhone restricts user freedoms. Does inconveniencing Apple customers help the FSF win friends and influence?

Over the weekend the Free Software Foundation called on visitors to the Defective by Design website to book slots at Apple Genius Bars across the US, Australia, Canada, Italy and the UK to pose questions to Genius Bar staff about ways that the iPhone restricts user freedoms. Does inconveniencing Apple customers help the FSF win friends and influence?

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Last week, we announced 5 reasons to avoid the iPhone. This has been met with a lot of excitement and some great feedback.

Some important questions were raised in this feedback. So, here is an opportunity to have some fun and get answers, straight from the horse's mouth, so to speak.

In every Apple retail store is a so-called "Genius Bar" -- a technical support station, the purpose of which is to offer help and support for Apple products.

You can use Apple's helpful online booking system (no registration required) to reserve time slots at the Genius Bar. There are currently 217 Apple stores in seven countries, giving us plenty of slots to book. We want as many people as possible to book slots this Friday and Saturday. Why not book more than one? Having lots of slots booked will get Apple's attention and ensure that the Geniuses have done their homework.

Here are the questions (PDF) the FSF wanted those taking part to ask at the Genius Bar. 

[poll id=333]

I'm not really sure if I understand the reasoning behind this kind of action. I think that it's just going to end up with both Apple and Apple customers trying to get service at the Genius Bar getting annoyed with the FSF.

I have to admit that the call to book more than one slot seemed a little excessive to me. There's a fine line between asking a questions and being a pain in the rear.

What are your thoughts on this kind of action? Does flooding Genius Bars with rights-related questions help to achieve anything positive or is this kind of campaign defective by design?

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