Google CEO: Competitors won't slow us down

Although most of the attention was focused on Google+ during Google's quarterly webcast for investors on Thursday, CEO Larry Page did take a moment to address its patent dispute with Oracle.

Although most of the attention was focused on Google+ during Google's quarterly webcast for investors on Thursday, CEO Larry Page did take a moment to address its patent disputes with competitors.

Of course, it was a very brief moment - quite similar to when Google's executive chairman and former CEO Eric Schmidt recently answered questions about the FTC and problems with China.

See Also: Google's Page upbeat after 3 months on job: 10 million on Google+

The latest developments in the ongoing struggle between Oracle and Google rests on a Java patent claim after the acquisition of Sun Microsystems as Oracle wants to collect cash from Android device manufacturers. CEO Larry Ellison and company are arguing for at least $2.6 billion in rewards from Google over the alleged infringement.

Then there's Microsoft to worry about, which wants Samsung to pay up $15 for each Android handset it makes. Additionally, Microsoft, along with Apple and consortium of other major tech players, recently outbid Google for the Nortel telecommunications patents by paying $4.5 billion in cash. If Google had won, it could have solidified itself as a major and persuasive force (if it's not already) in the mobile industry.

Nevertheless, Page is holding on to an optimistic outlook. Without delving into any specifics and offering rather thin responses in general during the call, Page kept it simple by saying that "despite the efforts of some of our competitors, there hasn't been any slow down" when it comes to building more Android devices, and that "we will support it in a cost-effective manner."

Considering that there are roughly 550,000 Android phones activated each day on average, it doesn't look like there is any sign of a slow down whatsoever.

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