Google loses book copyright case in France

Summary:In a Globe and Mail report,  Google has been convicted of violating France's copyright laws. The company plans to appeal.

In a Globe and Mail report,  Google has been convicted of violating France's copyright laws. The company plans to appeal. Google may yet face an EU hearing if Google continues to persist publishing excerpts of books without permission of the copyright holders. According to the report,  over 80% of the French books Google has copied are still copyright protected.

The head of the French publisher's union said he was "completely satisfied" with the verdict.

"It shows Google that they are not the kings of the world and they can't do whatever they want," said Serge Eyrolles, president of France's Syndicat National de l'Edition. He said Google had scanned 100,000 French books into its database - 80 per cent of which were under copyright.

Germany has already voiced concerns and this may open the door to future European litigation. Google's legal team will be busy for the foreseeable future and indicates the company is willing to charge ahead and ask for forgiveness later even if it means large penalties. Google finances are not in jeopardy in this fight.

Topics: Legal, Enterprise Software, Google

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