Gunshots, First Responders, and VoIP

Whether you are talking about putting a traffic light at an intersection, or ensuring that first-repsonder agencies have adequate communication, there's something in our nature that responds most urgently to a systemic problem after the problem is seriously exposed.Immediately after the terrorist attacks of Sept.

Whether you are talking about putting a traffic light at an intersection, or ensuring that first-repsonder agencies have adequate communication, there's something in our nature that responds most urgently to a systemic problem after the problem is seriously exposed.

Immediately after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, news came out that in many cities, first-responders such as police, fire, and emergency medical services could not efficiently communicate internally, or with partner first-responder agencies.

Terrorism is an international threat, but does not represent the day-to-day communication challenges these agencies face. Take cities with high crime rates. Calls must be responded to, and far too often, emergency care for trauma-related injuries must be coordinated.

Although telecommunication challengesremain, there has been progress. VoIP is a part of this progress. In fact, just today, the city of Baltimore's Health Department announced it would useTeleCommunications System's SwiftLink 2300 VoIP solution to connect the Health Department's remote triage centers with each other, and with the main office.

Communications capability includes simultaneous VoIP, along with two-way, IP-based video reach-back to the home office.

A quick set-up is important for complicated emergencies. SwiftLink 2300 can be set up at any site in five minutes.

Kudos to the City of Baltimore for choosing a proactive VOIP-enabled solution that more cities should seriously consider.

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