How much noise should an enterprise vendor make?

The whole idea is to build expandable, open architecture making it easy to link with other products.

Most enterprise software vendors are quiet. They're more William H. Macy than Tom Cruise.

Big customers like that, which may be why firms in what I call IBM's posse, like CentricCRM, don't try to make news. Do your job, keep your customers satisfied, and word will get out as far as it needs to.

Since parting company at the end of last year with CTO William Hurley, Qlusters has gone back into those shadows. CEO and founder Ofer Shoshan is not a man for the grand gesture. Neither, any more, is his company.

Shoshan called last week to discuss his management project's expanded virtualization and Xen support. "The whole idea is to build expandable, open architecture making it easy to link with other products.

"Our support for virtualization is both inside OpenQRM and for plug-ins to different technologies. We've officially released the Xen plug-in so you can have one OpenQRM server supporting remote boxes and Xen partitions, or support the Xen Hypervisor itself."

For the large enterprises, usually with hundreds of servers, who are moving from homegrown solutions to OpenQRM, this is a good thing. It's not for the front page of the New York Post, but it's a good thing.

Shoshan has also quieted the hype surrounding the Open Management Consortium Hurley announced with great fanfare last May. Now it's just some vendors trying to inter-operate. It's no longer the greatest thing since sliced bread, and doesn't have to be.

If it serves the customer, people will find it.  

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