HP's Mobile E-Services Bazaar to lead the way

The global company that first started out in a garage in Palo Alto is breaking new ground in the mobile marketplace. Having introduced the concept of mobile e-services that can perform work, achieve tasks, or complete transactions, Kelvin Tan, director of Mobile E-services Bazaar in HP Singapore, believes that any asset can be turned into an e-service and turned into a revenue stream.

Kelvin TanThe global company that first started out in a garage in Palo Alto is breaking new ground in the mobile marketplace. Having introduced the concept of mobile e-services that can perform work, achieve tasks, or complete transactions, Kelvin Tan, director of Mobile E-services Bazaar in HP Singapore, believes that any asset can be turned into an e-service and turned into a revenue stream.

What are the factors to consider in a wireless environment?
Every device in any environment can become a resource or a service to anything else in the environment by connecting to an open standards-based, always-on Internet infrastructure to access e-services. GPRS and 3G are technologies of a service-centric world where it is not just about delivering mobile e-services to a mobile appliance, but also about letting that appliance take full advantage of the resources in the world around it.

HP realises that any new technology will need nurturing before it can become commercially viable. Working together with our partners in initiatives like the HP mobile e-services bazaar, we are focused on making technology and its benefits accessible to individuals and businesses through simple appliances, useful e﷓services and solutions for an Internet infrastructure that is always on.

Tell us more about HP's concept of the mobile ecosystem.
HP believes that a critical component of the mobile ecosystem is the concept of mobile e-services. These are modular, nimble, electronic services that perform work, achieve tasks, or complete transactions. Almost any asset can be turned into an e-service and offered via the Internet to drive new revenue streams and create new efficiencies. E-services are real and they are available today.

Clearly, the future of computing and the Internet is wireless. According to IDC, in 2001, 500 million people globally will have PCs connected to the Internet, while 600 million people will be using wireless telephones. IDC also estimates that by 2003, global wireless Internet transactions will reach US$38 billion. There is no denying that mobile commerce will be a new way of doing business. No doubt WAP (Wireless Application Protocol) has its limitations for commerce, but this is just the beginning of the transition into a whole new age.

Location-based services are a form of mobile e-services and are intimately linked to 3G as part of the integrated services offerings made possible with the technology. Location-based services can enhance customer care and service personalisation for users, which are critical success factors for 3G operators.

HP is collaborating with some of our Bazaar partners in developing location-based services applications and solutions for commercial deployment.

Where does the future for wireless mobile technologies lie?
HP believes that the future of computing and the Internet is wireless, and is already looking at technologies beyond 3G. In collaboration with Japan’s NTT DoCoMo, HP is currently engaged in joint research efforts aimed at improving multimedia delivery and network applications over 4G wireless broadband networks. Called MOTO-Media, the technology is expected to enable high-performance streaming of multimedia content to mobile users based on agent technology, optimal use of network resources and scalable media coding methods.

What is the mobile e-services bazaar?
The HP mobile e-services bazaar is a S$35 million (US$19.4 million) investment by HP, and is an ecosystem with more than 350 active members who collaborate to create new e-services for the mobile and wireless markets. With locations around the world, the bazaar is a centre of innovation for emerging mobile technologies, dedicated to creating e-services based on information access, personalisation, context awareness and spontaneous content delivery.

The bazaar gives service providers and enterprises the ability to view and test new mobile e-services, join special interest groups, access relevant information and gain access to a constant supply of innovative new solutions.

Is Asia a big market for HP?
There were 230 million mobile phone subscribers in the Asia Pacific region by the end of last year, according to Gartner Dataquest, representing a 52 percent increase over 1999. On the other hand, IDC research predicted that the number of mobile phone subscribers worldwide would hit 600 million in 2001.

IDC also estimates that the number of wireless Internet subscribers in the United States, Western Europe, Asia-Pacific and Japan will soar from 5 million in 1999 to more than 329 million by 2003. However, the most unique IT trend in Asia Pacific compared to other parts of the world is the fact that the region has been adopting wireless technology more readily and rapidly than the others. There has been a big adoption of PCs, but wireless devices are the biggest trend. Asia Pacific (ex-Japan) will see 94.8 million wireless Internet users in 2003, before reaching 141.7 million users in 2004.

More about Top 20 Telecoms' Outlook.

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