IBM cooks up new storage architecture

Summary:IBM on Friday will detail a storage architecture dubbed the General Parallel File System-Shared Nothing Cluster that's designed to improve analytics and keep crunching numbers even through failures and malfunctions.

IBM on Friday will detail a storage architecture dubbed the General Parallel File System-Shared Nothing Cluster that's designed to improve analytics and keep crunching numbers even through failures and malfunctions.

Unveiled at the Supercomputing 2010 conference in New Orleans, the General Parallel File System-Shared Nothing Cluster, or GPFS-SNC, is able to convert terabytes of data into something that's actionable twice as fast as before. The architecture won the storage challenge at the conference.

The gist of the architecture goes like this:

  • Each node is independent and self-sufficient;
  • Tasks are divvyed up between computers;
  • The distributed approach eliminates bandwidth bottlenecks in storage area networks;
  • The system can provide data access through outages.

The architecture is a fairly simple set-up that could have implications for enterprise customers.

Topics: IBM, Hardware, Storage

About

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and SmartPlanet as well as Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CN... Full Bio

zdnet_core.socialButton.googleLabel Contact Disclosure

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Related Stories

The best of ZDNet, delivered

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
Subscription failed.