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IBM to design Air Force cloud computing network

IBM said Thursday that it will unveil advanced cybersecurity and analytics technology as part of a 10-month project to design and demonstrate secure cloud computing infrastructure for the Air Force.

IBM said Thursday that it will unveil advanced cybersecurity and analytics technology as part of a 10-month project to design and demonstrate secure cloud computing infrastructure for the Air Force.

What's in it for IBM? Cloud computing has a lot of interest, but security remains a worry for many IT buyers. If Big Blue can demonstrate cloud-based cyber security technologies that's good enough for the military it would allay a lot of those worries.

The advanced cyber security and analytics technologies that will be used in the Air Force project were developed by IBM Research.

According to IBM the project will show a cloud computing architecture that can support large networks and meet the government’s security guidelines. The Air Force network has almost 100 bases and 700,000 active military personnel.

Under the agreement, IBM researchers, software architects, security experts and analytics specialists will work with military personnel on the project. IBM also said it will utilize stream computing analytics. Toss that technology in with sensors, monitors and detection devices and the Air Force will have a ton of data to analyze.

Other key points about the project:

  • The model will include autonomic computing;
  • Dashboards will monitor the health of the network second-by-second;
  • If Air Force personnel doesn't shift to a "prevention environment" in a cyber attack the cloud will have automated services to lock the network down.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com

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