If you don't like AAPL's "Steve's health is a private matter" statement, then sell

Steve Jobs' health is once again being debated, and Apple's "Steve's health is a private matter" statement seems to have done nothing to put investors at ease. But the honest trust is that if you don't like that statement, then it's time to sell Apple stock.

Steve Jobs' health is once again being debated, and Apple's "Steve's health is a private matter" statement seems to have done nothing to put investors at ease. But the honest trust is that if you don't like that statement, then it's time to sell Apple stock.

I'm not going to speculate over Jobs' health, beyond wishing him the best, but those with money riding on the company seem to what a minute-by-minute update on the CEO's health and well-being. Here's Silicon Alley Insider's Henry Blodget calling on Apple to be more open:

Steve's health is obviously a private matter, but it's also a matter of supreme importance to Apple shareholders. We know of no big company, in fact, in which the CEO's health is a more critical consideration for shareholders than it is at Apple.

...

Steve Jobs is arguably Apple's single most valuable asset. If he's seriously ill, shareholders have every right to know this. The definition of "material information," after all, is information that the average investor would consider important in making an investment decision--and it's hard to see how an Apple investor would not consider Steve's health material.

While no one should invest money without first doing research (and you should never invest in anything you don't understand), no CEO I know of comes complete with a certificate of immortality and there's no one (not even a CFO) that can make any predictable guarantees for the future. If you think any differently, then you probably shouldn't be investing in companies (after all, CEO's are renowned for having sports cars, undertaking a lot of travel and being under a fair bit of stress).

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Also, Blodget says that "if he's [Jobs] seriously ill, shareholders have every right to know this." True, so isn't the fact that Apple didn't say that Jobs was seriously ill a sign that he isn't, and is in fact, in good health?

The bottom line of things is that if you're an Apple investor and you don't like the "Steve's health is a private matter" statement made by CFO Peter Oppenheimer then there's only one thing you should do - sell you Apple stock and invest in a company that you trust more. Just as you shouldn't lend money to someone you don't trust, you shouldn't invest in companies if you don't trust the management. It's as simple as that.

So, anyone here concerned about the stock they hold in Apple?

Disclosure: I don't own any Apple stock or hold any interests in the company.

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