iMac supply keeps up with demand

Summary:Shaking its reputation for product shortages, Apple so far seems to be keeping pace with the brisk sales of the iMac. Furthermore, the company's efforts to push iMacs out the door apparently haven't impeded its ability to deliver professional desktop systems or PowerBooks.

Shaking its reputation for product shortages, Apple so far seems to be keeping pace with the brisk sales of the iMac.

Furthermore, the company's efforts to push iMacs out the door apparently haven't impeded its ability to deliver professional desktop systems or PowerBooks.

None of the retailers contacted by MacWEEK.com today reported iMac shortages, despite the popularity of the consumer device, which hit the channel on Saturday.

"We got 50 more today, and we've received 90 since Thursday," said Tom Santos, president of MACadam Computer in San Francisco.

Michael France, CEO of MacCenter of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., said despite "incredibly strong" sales for the iMac, the company still has units available for sale. "We sold out our allocation over the weekend, store traffic has increased 50 to 60 percent, and we continue to see high demand for the product," France said.

Abe Brown, spokesman for J&R Computer World in New York, said his shop still has iMacs in stock. "We're selling well, and we're seeing an abnormal amount of first-time computer buyers."

Although Apple's factories in Singapore, Ireland and California are simultaneously churning out iMacs, resellers said they remain well-supplied with other Mac models. Even Apple's traditional manufacturing problem child, the PowerBook line, is readily available, they said.

In fact, PowerBook availability is "even better than the iMac," MACadam's Santos said. "Only the 250 [-MHz G3 PowerBook] and 292 haven't been available, but Apple told us today that they're back in."

Topics: Apple, Hardware, Singapore

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