Is Linux the natural OS of opposition?

As the UK’s Labour Party leadership battle heats up, there are dire warnings by one of the leading contenders that “Labour risked falling back into a "comfort zone" of opposition”, where it would become a “party of protest, big in heart but essentially naïve, well meaning but behind the times”It is Wednesday, it has started raining, and I feel mildly morose. Which led me to thinking that maybe Linux is the natural OS of opposition?

As the UK’s Labour Party leadership battle heats up, there are dire warnings by one of the leading contenders that “Labour risked falling back into a "comfort zone" of opposition”, where it would become a “party of protest, big in heart but essentially naïve, well meaning but behind the times”

It is Wednesday, it has started raining, and I feel mildly morose. Which led me to thinking that maybe Linux is the natural OS of opposition? In the past two years Linux has risen from 0.8% of ‘operating system share trend’ to a not so glorious 0.9%. This is despite Microsoft’s Vistaster own goal.

Steve Jobs has magnificently stitched-up large swathes of the mobile market to the detriment of Google’s open source OS Android (which has led some commentators to suggest that people care more about convenience than they do about freedom).

So will Linux remain the diminutive darling of the right-minded, left-field, beardy & lentil-munching fringes of society? Or is something going to give?

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