McKinnon loses more appeals on U.S. extradition

Gary McKinnon, the Briton who allegedly hacked into 97 NASA and Defense Department computers, has lost even more pleas to avoid extradition to the U.S.

Gary McKinnon, the Briton who allegedly hacked into 97 NASA and Defense Department computers, has lost even more pleas to avoid extradition to the U.S., Wired reports. Despite McKinnon's arguments that he suffered from Asperger's syndrome and could be at risk for psychosis, the judge ruled there was no basis to stop an extradition, AP reports.

"It would be illegal for me to stop the extradition of Gary McKinnon, which the court ruling has made clear," he said in a statement. "Mr. McKinnon is accused of serious crimes, and the U.S. has a lawful right to seek his extradition, as we do when we wish to prosecute people who break our laws."
McKinnon's lawyer says she's taking the matter to Britain's Supreme Court.
"We have 28 days to review the judgment and will continue to explore every legal avenue until we achieve a just and proper result," she said. Karen Todner said she planned to appeal the High Court decision, possibly taking the case to Britain's new Supreme Court and the European courts.

The case has become a cause celebre as the likes of Bob Geldolf, Chrissie Hynde and Peter Gabriel have adopted the 60s protest song "Chicago" to McKinnon's cause.

You can change the world rearrange the world
It’s dying – if you believe in justice
Dying – and if you believe in freedom
Dying – Give Gary back his life
Dying – make a world we can believe in, open up the door

Surely there must be greater injustices in the world that this. It's not like the U.S. is Afghanistan.

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